Vaiouli & Andrews (2018)

February 13, 2019

SECONDARY REVIEW CRITIQUE

KEY:

ASD =  Autism Spectrum Disorder

C =  clinician

f =  female

m =  male

MT =  music therapy

NA =  not applicable

P =  patient or participant

pmh =  Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP =  speech-language pathologist

SR =  Systematic Review

 

Source:  Vaiouli, P., & Andreou, G. (2018). Communication and language of young children with autism: A review of the research in music. Communication Disorders Quarterly, 39(2), 323-329.

Reviewer(s):  pmh

Date:  February 10, 2019

Overall Assigned Grade: B-    The highest possible grade based on the level of evidence is B.  The overall grade should be interpreted as a rating of the quality of the evidence supporting the investigation’s findings. It is not a judgment about the quality or effectiveness of the music therapy. 

Level of Evidence:  B

Take Away:  The purpose of this review was to investigate the use of music therapy (MT) for improving communication development of children (ages 0 to 8 years) diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). The investigators identified 3 uses of music in the improvement of speech, language, and communication targets:  (1) to facilitate preverbal communication by using music to engage the children, (2) to improve receptive language, and (3) to improve expressive language (i.e., the production of speech and language.)

 

What type of secondary review?  Narrative Systematic Review

 

  1. Were the results valid?  Yes
  • Was the review based on a clinically sound clinical question?
  • Did the reviewers clearly describe reasonable criteria for inclusion and exclusion of literature in the review (i.e., sources)?
  • The authors of the secondary research noted that they reviewed the following resource:internet based databases
  • Did the sources involve only English language publications?Yes
  • Did the sources include unpublished studies? No
  • Was the time frame for the publication of the sources sufficient?
  • Did the authors of the secondary research identify the level of evidence of the sources? No, but they identified the design of the investigations.        
  • Did the authors of the secondary research describe procedures used to evaluate the validity of each of the sources?Yes
  • Was there evidence that a specific, predetermined strategy was used to evaluate the sources?
  • Did the authors of the secondary research or review teams rate the sources independently? Unclear
  • Were interrater reliability data provided?No
  • If there were no interrater reliability data, was an alternate means to insure reliability described? No
  • Were assessments of sources sufficiently reliable?Unclear
  • Was the information provided sufficient for the reader to undertake a replication?Yes
  • Did the sources that were evaluated involve a sufficient number of participants? Yes(on the average)
  • Were there a sufficient number of sources?No

 

  1. Description of outcome measures:

 

  • The investigation was not concerned about outcomes, rather the focus was on describing the nature of MT associated with language and communication development for children with ASD.

 

  1. Description of results:
  • What measures were used to represent the magnitude of the treatment/effect size? No measure of the magnitude of the treatment effect/effect size were reported because the focus of the investigation was not treatment effectiveness.
  • Summary overall findings of the secondary research: The investigators described 3 uses of music:

–  To facilitate preverbal communication by using music to engage the children

–  To improve receptive language

–  To improve expressive language (i.e., the production of speech and

language

  • Were the results precise? Not Applicable (NA)
  • Were the results of individual studies clearly displayed/presented?Yes
  • Were the findings reasonable in view of the current literature? Yes

                                                                                                                   

  1. Were maintenance data reported?NA

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?NA

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

Population:  Autism Spectrum Disorder; Children

Purpose:  To identify how music is used when targeting speech, language, and communication improvement in children with ASD

Nonprosodic Targets:  preverbal communication, receptive language, expressive language (speech and language production)

Aspects of Prosody Used in Treatment of Nonprosodic Targets: music (pitch rhythm, loudness, duration)

 

  • The investigators identified 9 sources that met inclusion and exclusion criteria.

 

  • From the 9 sources, the investigators described 3 uses of music:

–  To facilitate preverbal communication by using music to engage the children

–  To improve receptive language

–  To improve expressive language (i.e., the production of speech and

language

 

TO FACILITATE PREVERBAL COMMUNICATION BY USING MUSIC TO ENGAGE THE CHILDREN

 

  • Number of studies: 2
  • Total Number of Participants (Ps):4
  • Music Techniques:  Songs, familiar melodies, sung directives

 

TO IMPROVE RECEPTIVE LANGUAGE

 

  • Number of studies: 3
  • Total Number of Ps:35
  • Music Techniques:  Songs and precomposed sngs

 

TO IMPROVE EXPRESSIVE LANGUAGE (I.E., THE PRODUCTION OF SPEECH AND  LANGUAGE

 

  • Number of studies: 4
  • Total Number of Ps:90
  • Music Techniques:  Songs, familiar melodies, singing, tapping

 

————————————————————————————————————

 

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Stoeckel (2016)

August 14, 2018

CRITIQUE OF UNSUPPORTED PROCEDURAL DESCRIPTIONS

(also known as Expert Opinion)

NOTE:  Scroll ½ way down this post to access the summaries for the 5 activities.

KEY

C =  clinician

CAS = Childhood Apraxia of Speech

NA = not applicable

P =  patient or participant

pmh =  Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech-language pathologist

Source:  Stoeckel, R. (2016.)  5 fun ways to mix prosody into CAS therapy.  Retrieved from http://www.medbridgeeducation.com/blog/2016/10/5-fun-ways-to-mix-prosody-into-cas-therapy/ 

Reviewer(s):  pmh

Date:  August 14, 2018

Overall Assigned Grade (because there are no supporting data, the highest grade will be F)

Level of Evidence:  F = Expert Opinion, no supporting evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention although the author may provide secondary evidence supporting components of the intervention. The Level of Evidence grade should not be construed as a judgment of the quality of the recommended activities. It is only concerned with the nature of the evidence supporting the author’s recommendation.

 

Take Away:  This blog post briefly describes activities that speech language pathologists (SLPs) can use to integrate prosody into interventions for children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS.) 

  1. Was there a review of the literature supporting components of the intervention?No, the author did not provide a review of the literature supporting the recommended activities but did provide a brief review of a rationale for integrating prosody activities into intervention for children with CAS.

 

  1. Were the specific procedures/components of the intervention tied to the reviewed literature? No, the author did not provide a review of the literature supporting the recommended activities but did provide a brief review of a rationale for integrating prosody into intervention for children with CAS.

 

  1. Was the intervention based on clinically sound clinical procedures? Yes

 

  1. Did the author(s) provide a rationale for components of the intervention? No

 

  1. Description of outcome measures:

 

  • Are outcome measures suggested? No

 

  1. Was generalization addressed? No

 

  1. Was maintenance addressed? No

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

NOTE:  The author recommended 5 activities for integrating prosody into treatment of children with CAS. The 5 activities are

–  Songs and Fingerplays

–  Toys that Provide Auditory Feedback

–  Action Figures, Dolls, and Stuffed Animals

–  Board Games

–  Books

Songs and Fingerplays

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  stress, music

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:  duration, loudness, pitch

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: production of word or phrase

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • The clinician (C) can focus on either one aspect of prosody or multiple aspects of prosody depending on the age of the child.
  • For example, C may encourage the participant (P) to use duration alone to mark stress or to use pitch, loudness, and duration.
  • This activity can also be used to focus on target words/phrases to be produced in the songs.

 

 Toys that Provide Auditory Feedback

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children 

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  loudness, music

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:  rhythm

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: production of syllables

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • Toys with embedded microphones can facilitate the production of different aspects of prosody.
  • The use of drums can encourage the production of loudness or of targeted syllables.

 

Action Figures, Dolls, and Stuffed Animals

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED: pitch, loudness

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: voice quality; words/phrases

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • Role playing with action figures, dolls, and stuffed (plush) animals can focus on prosody by encouraging P to use different speaking styles for different characters and to signal different meanings.
  • C encourages target words/phrases production as part of the play.

 

Board Games

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children 

MODALITY TARGETED: production

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  rate, contrastive stress

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: voice quality 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • Before taking a turn P imitates sentences/phrases modeled by C with

– different voice qualities or

– different rates

  • C asks P questions to elicit contrastive such as

– Is it YOUR turn or MY turn?  (p. 2)

– Does your character have BLUE eyes? (p. 2.)

Books

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children 

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  affective prosody

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: literacy 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

EMERGING READERS:

  • When reading with the P, C has him/her complete a sentence that signals

– an emotion,

– emphasis,

–  a character voice (p. 2.)

 

READER:

  • C identifies passages that could benefit with modifications of prosody to enhance interest.
  • C provides reading material a little below P’s reading level when P is practicing prosodic modifications during reading aloud activities.

 

=========================================================

 


Hallam (2018)

July 16, 2018

EBP THERAPY ANALYSIS

Treatment Groups

Note: Scroll about two-thirds of the way down the page to read the summary of the procedure(s).

Key:

C = Clinician

EBP = evidence-based practice

f = female

m = male

NA = not applicable

P = Patient or Participant

pmh =  Patricia  Hargrove, blog developer

RFR =  Rhythm for Reading program

SES = socioeconomic status

SLP = speech–language pathologist

 

SOURCE:  Hallam, S. (2018). Can a rhythmic intervention support reading development in poor readers?  Psychology of Music, 1-14. DOI:  10.1177/0305735618771491

REVIEWER(S):  pmh

 

DATE: July 13, 2018

 

ASSIGNED GRADE FOR OVERALL QUALITY:  B+ The highest possible grade, based on the design of the investigation, is  A. The Grade for Overall Quality reflects the quality of the evidence supporting the intervention. It is not an evaluation of the quality of the intervention nor is it an evaluation of the paper itself.

 

TAKE AWAY: Rhythm for Reading (RFR), a music-based intervention, resulted in improved reading accuracy and comprehension (but not reading rate) in poor readers in London schools who were 11-12 years of age.

 

  1. What type of evidence was identified?

                                                                                                           

  • What was the type of evidence?Prospective, Randomized Group Design with Controls

                                                                                                           

  • What was the level of support associated with the type of evidence? Level = A

 

                                                                                                           

  1. Group membership determination:

                                                                                                           

  • If there was more than one group, were participants (Ps) randomly assigned to groups? Yes, but  the investigators claimed that the Ps also were distributed equally on several variable.

 

  • If there were groups and Pswere not randomly assigned to groups, were members of groups carefully matched?  NA __x_____

                                                                    

 

  1. Was administration of intervention status concealed?

                                                                                                           

  • from participants? No

                                                                    

  • from clinicians? No

                                                                    

  • from analyzers? Unclear

                                                                    

 

  1. Were the groups adequately described? Yes

 

– How many  Ps were involved in the study?

  • total # of Ps: 421
  • # of groups:2
  • List names of groups and the # of participants in each group:
  • Treatment group = 209
  • Control group (no treatment) = 212

 

CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age:only included Ps who had just achieved or not achieved national reading criteria
  • Treatment group =  11 to 12 years old
  • Control group =  11 to 12 years old

 

  • gender:
  • Treatment group =  147 (m); 62 (f)
  • Control group =  141 (m); 71 (f)

 

  • Reading accuracy:
  •   Treatment group =  91.98
  • Control group =  91.34

 

  • Reading comprehension:
  • Treatment group =  85.57
  • Control group =  86.03

 

  • Reading rate:
  • Treatment group =  89.65
  • Control group =  98.58

 

  • Educational Level:
  • Treatment group =  year 7; first year of secondary school (British school system)
  • Control group =  year 7; first year of secondary school (British school system)

 

DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS

 

  • eligible for Free Lunch:
  • Treatment group =  70
  • Control group = 75

 

–   Were the groups similar before intervention began? Yes

                                                         

–  Were the communication problems adequately described?  Yes

  • disorder type: Literacy skills were labeled as ‘poor.’

 

 

  1. Was membership in groups maintained throughout the study?

                                                                                                             

  • Did each of the groups maintain at least 80% of their original members?Yes

                                                               

  • Were data from outliers removed from the study? No 

 

 

  1. Were the groups controlled acceptably?  Yes

                                                                                                             

  • Was there a no intervention group?Yes
  • Was there a foil intervention group? No
  • Was there a comparison group?No
  • Was the time involved in the foil/comparison and the target groups constant? NA, the control group was a No Intervention group.

 

 

  1. Were the outcomes measure appropriate and meaningful? Yes

 

–  OUTCOMES

  • OUTCOME #1:Changes in reading accuracy as measured by NARA II
  • OUTCOME #2:Changes in reading comprehension as measured by NARA II
  • OUTCOME #3:Changes in reading rate as measured by NARA II

 

–  The outcome measures that are subjective were

  • OUTCOME #1:Changes in reading accuracy as measured by NARA II
  • OUTCOME #2:Changes in reading comprehension as measured by NARA II

 

–  The outcome measure that is objective is

  • OUTCOME #3:Changes in reading rate as measured by NARA II

                                         

 

  1. Were reliability measures provided?
  • Interobserver for analyzers?No
  • Intraobserver for analyzers?No 
  • Treatment fidelity for clinicians? No

 

 

  1. What were the results of the statistical (inferential) testing and/or the description of the results?

 

SUMMARY OF IMPORTANT RESULTS

TREATMENT AND NO TREATMENT GROUP ANALYSES

 

—  What level of significance was required to claim significance?  p = 0.05

 

  • OUTCOME #1:Changes in reading accuracy as measured by NARA II—

Treatment group produced significantly more change than the control group

 

  • OUTCOME #2:Changes in reading comprehension as measured by NARA II–

–  Treatment group produced significantly more change than the control group

     – For the subgroup of Ps who received free lunches, Ps who received intervention performed significantly better than the control group

 

  • OUTCOME #3:Changes in reading rate as measured by NARA II—

–  The changes produced by the Treatment and Control groups were not significantly different.

 

–   What was the statistical test used to determine significance?

  • ANOVA xxx
  • MANOVA: xxx

 

–  Were confidence interval (CI) provided?  No

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significance

 

–   EBP measure provided: ETA

–  Results of EBP testing and the interpretation:

  • OUTCOME #1:

∞  Changes in reading accuracy for intervention group  versus control group as measured by NARA II—  Eta was 0.012  (small treatment effect)

 

  • OUTCOME #2:

–  Changes in reading comprehension for intervention group versus control group as measured by NARA II– Eta was 0.028  (small treatment effect)

–  Changes in reading comprehension for the subgroup of Ps who received free lunches fo intervention group versus control group as measured by NARA II– Eta was 0.014  (small treatment effect)

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported?No

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?No

 

 

  1. Describe briefly the experimental design of the investigation.
  • The Ps were low socioeconomic status (SES), inner city children who had been classified as having poor reading skills.
  • Ps were randomly assigned to treatment or no treatment groups. However, the assignments were not fully random because the investigators controlled for several P characteristics.
  • All Ps were assessed at the beginning and end of the treatment phase for the Treatment group. The investigators assessed the reading skills of the Ps using a published test of reading. Outcome measures were derived from the assessments.
  • The investigators compared the change for the Outcome measures to assess the effectiveness of the treatment.
  • The Ps in the Treatment group received the intervention in their home schools. The investigators reported that there was variability with respect to implementation.

 

 

ASSIGNED OVERALL GRADE FOR QUALITY OF EXTERNAL EVIDENCE:  B+

 

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

PURPOSE:Does musical rhythmic intervention improve reading skills?

 

POPULATION: Poor readers

 

MODALITY TARGETED:  production, comprehension

 

 

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:  music (rhythm, pitch, pausing)

 

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED:literacy

 

DOSAGE:  group, 10 minutes a week, for 10 weeks

 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

 

  • The intervention was the Rhythm for Reading program (RFR.)

 

  • RFR was developed for economically disadvantaged children with educational challenges.

 

  • RFR is an intensive, group intervention designed to improve selected aspects of cognitive attention

–  stability,

– strength, and

– resilience.

 

  • The focus of RFR was to improve auditory processing and attention.

 

  • RFR used a variety of musical styles including

– classical western music,

– funk,

– rock,

– pop,

– syncopation, and

– metrical complexity.

 

  • Intervention activities included reading simple musical notation and the following in time with the beat of music by

– clapping,

– chanting, and

– stamping feet

 

  • Simple musical notation consisted of

–  2 levels of beat,

– restricted pitch levels, and

– restricted intervals between pitches.

 

_______________________________________________________________


Chenausky & Schlag (2018)

April 29, 2018

EBP THERAPY ANALYSIS

Treatment Groups 

Note: Scroll about 80% of the way down the page to read the summary of the procedure.

 Key:

AMMT =  Auditory-motor mapping training

approximately correct =  P produced consonant bisyllable target with 2 of 3

features (manner, place, voicing)  of an adult form of the consonant AND the

vowel portion of the bisyllable target was of the same class (i.e., same height

and degree of backness)

ASD =  Autism Spectrum Disorder

C = Clinician

EBP = evidence-based practice

f = female

m = male

MV =  Minimally Verbal

NA = not applicable

P = Patient or Participant

pmh =  Patricia  Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech–language pathologist

SRT =  Speech Repetition Therapy

 

 

SOURCE: Chenausky, K. V., & Schlaug, G. (2018). From intuition to intervention: Developing an intonation-based treatment for autism.  Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1-13. doi: 10.1111/nyas. 13609 (Early Online Version before inclusion in an issue)

 

 

REVIEWER(S):  pmh

 

DATE:   April 24, 2018

 

ASSIGNED GRADE FOR OVERALL QUALITY: 

– Proof of Concept Study =  C-

– Replication Study =  C-

– Comparison Study =  B-

 

TAKE AWAY: Although the article provides information that could be used as a summary of stages of program assessment, the focus of this review is limited to the evidence for the effective of a music-based intervention: Auditory-motor mapping training (AMMT.) Three studies were reported in this investigation:  Proof of Concept, Replication, and Comparison. Some participants’ data were used in more than one investigation. Each of the studies is reviewed separately and indicate that AMMT has potential for success.

 

 

  1. What type of evidence was identified?

                                                                                                           

  • What was the type of evidence?

     – Prospective, Nonrandomized Group Design with Controls?   Comparison Study

– Prospective, Single Group with Pre- and Post-Testing  Proof of Concept Study, Replication Study

 

  • What was the level of support associated with the type of evidence?

     – Proof of Concept Level = C+

     – Replication Level = C+

     – Comparison Level = B+

 

PROOF OF CONCEPT STUDY

                                                                                                           

  1. Group membership determination:

                                                                                                           

  • If there was more than one group, were participants (Ps) randomly assigned to groups?Not Applicable

 

  • If there were groups and Ps were not randomly assigned to groups, were members of groups carefully matched?NA

 

 

  1. Was administration of intervention status concealed?

                                                                                                           

  • from participants?No
  • from clinicians? No
  • from analyzers? Yes

                                                                    

 

  1. Was the group adequately described? No

 

–  How many  Ps were involved in the study?

  • total # of Ps:   6
  • # of groups:  1

 

–  CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS

  • expressive vocabulary:less than 20 words
  • imitation skills: able to imitate at least 2 sounds
  • diagnosis:Minimally Verbal (MV) Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • other diagnoses:excluded sensorineural disorders (e.g., deafness, Down syndrome)

 

–  DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age:5 years 9 months to  8 years 9 months (mean = 6 years 7 months)
  • gender: 1f; 5m

 

–   Were the groups similar before intervention began? NA, there was only one group.

                                                         

–  Were the communication problems adequately described?  No

  • disorder type:  MV ASD
  • functional level:  baseline phonetic inventory =  7.9 (+/- 5.3)

 

 

  1. Was membership in the group maintained throughout the study?

                                                                                                             

  • Did the group maintain at least 80% of their original members? Yes
  • Were data from outliers removed from the study? No 

 

 

  1. Was the group controlled acceptably?  No, this was a single group study.

 

 

  1. Was the outcome measure appropriate and meaningful? Yes

 

  • OUTCOME #1:Percentage of “syllables approximately correct” (p. 4)  from a list of 30 bisyllable words/phrases

 

NOTE:  approximately correct =  P produced consonant bisyllable target with 2 of 3 features (manner, place, voicing)  of an adult form of the consonant AND the vowel portion of the bisyllable target was of the same class (i.e., same height and degree of backness)

 

  • The outcome measures was subjective.

 

*  The outcome measure was NOTobjective.

                                         

 

  1. Were reliability measures provided?

                                                                                                             

  • Interobserver for analyzers?Yes

    –  OUTCOME #1:  Percentage of “syllables approximately correct” (p. 4)  from a list  of 30 bisyllable words/phrases

–  for the measure “approximately correct”

            ∞ percent of interobserver agreement was 68%

            ∞ difference in from change agreement–  Cohen’s K = 0.55 (p <

                0.0005)

            ∞ investigators claimed these measures were “favorable” (p. 5) and

                 “at least ‘moderate’ or ‘good’)

 

  • Intraobserver for analyzers?No 

 

  • Treatment fidelity for clinicians? No , but the investigators developed a manual describing treatment procedures.

 

 

  1. What were the results of the statistical (inferential) testing and/or the description of the results?

 

– Summary Of Important Results

     ∞  What level of significance was required to claim significance? p = 0.05

 

 

PRE AND POST TREATMENT ONLY ANALYSES

 

 

  • OUTCOME #1:Percentage of “syllables approximately correct” (p. 4)  from a list of 30 bisyllable words/phrases:  Ps scores were significantly better following treatment compared to pretreatment data

 

  • What was the statistical test used to determine significance?

–  t-test

     –  binominal test of significant

 

  • Were confidence interval (CI) provided?Yes

     –  95% CI:  xxx, investigators reported that the Ps pretreatment scores were beyond the 95% CI for the post intervention scores.

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significanceNo EBP data provided but investigators claim clinical significance by describing the increase of percentage of approximately correct bisyllables.

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported?No

 

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?No, but the outcome measure included trained and untrained stimuli but the trained/untrained data were not presented separately.

 

 

  1. Describe briefly the experimental design of the investigation.

 

  • Six Ps were selected to determine if AMMT regularly resulted in improvements in the outcome.

 

  • The 6 Ps each participated in 40 treatment sessions and served as his/her control.

 

  • The investigators performed multiple baseline assessment of the outcome and used the best performance of each P as his/her baseline.

 

  • Following the 10thsession and every 5 sessions after the 10th, the investigators performed an assessment or probe session. Probe sessions were similar to the treatment session except they included both trained and untrained (generalization) stimuli.

 

  • Each Ps’ clinician (C) administered the probes but the ratings of correct/incorrect were performed by a blinded rater.

 

 

GRADE= C-

 

 

REPLICATION STUDY

 

 

  1. Group membership determination:

                                                                                                           

  • If there was more than one group, were participants (Ps) randomly assigned to groups? Not Applicable (NA), there was only one group.

 

 

  1. Was administration of intervention status concealed?

                                                                                                           

  • from participants? No
  • from clinicians?No
  • from analyzers? Yes

                                                                    

 

  1. Was the group adequately described? No

 

– How many  Ps were involved in the study?

  • total # of Ps: 17
  • # of groups:1

 

–  CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS

  • expressive vocabulary:less than 20 words
  • imitation skills: able to imitate at least 2 sounds
  • diagnosis:Minimally Verbal (MV) Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • other diagnoses:excluded sensorineural disorders (e.g., deafness, Down syndrome)

 

–  DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age:3 years; 5 months to 9 years; 8 months (mean =6 years; 6 months)
  • gender:2f; 15m

 

–   Were the groups similar before intervention began? NA , there was only one group.

                                                         

–  Were the communication problems adequately described?  No

  • disorder type: MV ASD
  • functional level: baseline phonetic inventory:  mean = 7.2 (+/- 4.3)

 

 

  1. Was membership in the group maintained throughout the study?

                                                                                                             

  • Did the group maintain at least 80% of their original members? Yes
  • Were data from outliers removed from the study?No 

 

 

  1. Were the groups controlled acceptably?  NA, there was only a single group.

 

 

  1. Was the outcome measure appropriate and meaningful? Yes

 

  • OUTCOME #1:Percentage of “syllables approximately correct” (p. 4)  from a list of 30 bisyllable words/phrases

 

  • The outcome measures was subjective.
  • The outcome measure was NOTobjective.

                                         

 

  1. Were reliability measures provided?

                                                                                                             

  • Interobserver for analyzers?No, but see the results for interobserver reliability for the Proof of Concept study.

 

  • Intraobserver for analyzers?No 

 

  • Treatment fidelity for clinicians?Yes

–  All of the reviewed sessions included the major AMMT components (intoned speech) and drums.

 

 

  1. What were the results of the statistical (inferential) testing and/or the description of the results?

 

–  Summary Of Important Results

 

—  What level of significance was required to claim significance?  p = 0.05

 

PRE AND POST TREATMENT ONLY ANALYSES

 

OUTCOME #1:  Percentage of “syllables approximately correct” (p. 4)  from a list  of 30 bisyllable words/phrases imitated

  • There post treatment scores were significantly better than thepretreatment score.
  • The investigators compared the results of the Replication Group and the Proof of Concept Group at 25 sessions and determined

∞  that there was no significant difference between the groups,

∞  that their combined outcomes were significantly better after treatment, and

∞  that the trajectories of their improvement were similar

∞  overall the number of correct syllables in the combined groups was about 15 at baseline and 27 following 25 sessions.

 

 

—  What was the statistical test used to determine significance?

  • t-test
  • ANOVA

 

–  Were confidence interval (CI) provided?  No

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significance(List outcome number with data with the appropriate Evidence Based Practice, EBP, measure.) No 

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported?No

 

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?No, treated bisyllables were included in the assessment data but they were not described separately.

 

 

  1. Describe briefly the experimental design of the investigation.
  • Seventeen Ps were selected to determine to replicate the finding of the Proof of Concept study with a larger group.

 

  • The 17 Ps each participated in 25 treatment sessions and served as his/her control. The 25 sessions dosage is markedly reduced from the Proof of Concept study but was used because of the burden of 40 sessions for families. The decision also was made to use 25 sessions because almost 90% of the change in the Proof of Concept study had been achieved by session 25.

 

  • The investigators performed multiple initial preintervention assessments of the outcome and used the best performance of each P as his/her baseline.

 

  • Following the 10thsession and every 5 sessions after the 10th, the investigators performed an assessment or probe session. Probe sessions were similar to the treatment sessions except they included both trained and untrained (generalization) stimuli. Each Ps’ clinician (C) administered the probes but the ratings of correct/incorrect were performed by a blinded rater.

 

  • The investigators combinedthe data from the Ps in the Proof of Concept and the Replication studies because the performance of the 2 groups was similar.

 

GRADE C-

 

 

COMPARISON STUDY

 

  1. Group membership determination:

                                                                                                           

  • If there was more than one group, were participants (Ps) randomly assigned to groups? No 

 

  • If there were groups andthe Ps were not randomly assigned to groups, were members of groups carefully matched?  Yes
  • -Seven Ps from the original Ps in the Replication study were matched to 7 Ps who were to be assigned to the control group, Speech Repetition Therapy (SRT.)

     –  The Ps were matched on the basis of

∞  chronological age

∞  mental age

∞  baseline phonemic (phonetic) repetition ability

                                                                    

 

  1. Was administration of intervention status concealed?

                                                                                                           

  • from participants? No
  • from clinicians? No
  • from analyzers? Yes

                                                                    

 

  1. Were the groups adequately described? No

 

–  How many  Ps were involved in the study?

  • total # of Ps: probably
  • # of groups:2
  • List names of groups and the # of participants in each group:

     –  AMMT = 7  (a subgroup of Ps from the AMMT treated Replication study)

–  SRT = 7

 

–  CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS

  • expressive vocabulary:less than 20 words
  • imitation skills: able to imitate at least 2 sounds
  • diagnosis:Minimally Verbal (MV) Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • other diagnoses:excluded sensorineural disorders (e.g., deafness, Down syndrome)

 

–  DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age:

     –  AMMT = 3 years; 5 months to 8 years; 11 months (mean =  6 years, 1 month)

     –  SRT =  3 years; 9  months to 8 years; 5 months (means = 5 years; 8 months)

  • gender:

     –  AMMT = 7m

     –  SRT = 2f; 5m

 

–   Were the groups similar before intervention began? Yes

                                                         

–  Were the communication problems adequately described?  No 

  • disorder type: (List) MV  ASD
  • functional level: baseline phonetic inventory

– AMMT =  7.1 (+/- 3.4)

– SRT =  8.9 (+/- 5.4)

 

 

  1. Was membership in groups maintained throughout the study?

                                                                                                             

  • Did each of the groups maintain at least 80% of their original members? Yes

                                                               

  • Were data from outliers removed from the study? No 

 

 

  1. Were the groups controlled acceptably? Yes

                                                                                                             

  • Was there a no intervention group?No   
  • Was there a foil intervention group? No
  • Was there a comparison group?Yes
  • Was the time involved in the foil/comparison and the target groups constant? Yes

 

 

  1. Was the outcome measure appropriate and meaningful? Yes

                                                                                                             

  • OUTCOME #1:Percentage of “syllables approximately correct” (p. 4)  from a list of 30 bisyllable words/phrases

 

  • The outcome measure was subjective.
  • The outcome measure was NOT objective.

                                         

 

  1. Were reliability measures provided?

                                                                                                             

  • Interobserver for analyzers?No, but see the results for interobserver reliability for the Proof of Concept study.

 

  • Intraobserver for analyzers?No 

 

  • Treatment fidelity for clinicians?Yes

     – Every AMMT reviewed trial reviewed contained the 2 major components of AMMT:  intoned speech and drumming.

     – None of the SRT  trials reviewed contained the 2 major components of AMMT: intoned speech and drumming.

 

 

  1. What were the results of the statistical (inferential) testing and/or the description of the results?

 

  • Summary Of Important Results

 

—  What level of significance was required to claim significance?  p = 0.05

 

TREATMENT AND FOIL/COMPARISON/NO TREATMENT GROUP ANALYSES

 

  • OUTCOME #1:  Percentage of “syllables approximately correct” (p. 4)  from a list  of 30 bisyllable words/phrases

–  Overall, both the AMMT and the SRT groups improved significantly from baseline to the end of treatment.

     –  The 2 groups (AMMT, SRT) scores were not significantly different from one another over the 4 testing periods.

 

  • What was the statistical test used to determine significance? ANOVA

 

  • Were confidence interval (CI) provided? No

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significanceNA

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported? Yes  __x__  No ______
  • Improvements following treatment of 25 weeks were maintained 4 and 8 weeks post treatment.(That is, there no significant difference between outcomes immediately after treatment and 4 and 8 weeks post treatment.

 

  • There were no significantly different outcome scores for the 2 groups .

 

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?Yes

 

  • Trained stimuli were significantlymore likely to be correct than untrained stimuli.

 

  • There were no significantly different outcome scores for the 2 groups .

 

 

  1. Describe briefly the experimental design of the investigation.

 

  • The investigators matched 7 of the Ps from the Replication study to a group of Ps who received SRT.

 

  • The 14 Ps each participated in 25 treatment sessions and served as his/her control.

 

  • The investigators compared the outcomes of the AMMT and SRT groups following 25 sessions and analyzed the data.

 

  • For the maintenance analysis, the investigators then selected 10 AMMT Ps for the Replication study and the 7 SRT Ps from this Comparison study and compared their performance 4 and 8 weeks following the termination of treatment.

 

ASSIGNED OVERALL GRADE FOR QUALITY OF EXTERNAL EVIDENCE:  B-

 

 

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

PURPOSE: To determine if a music-based intervention (AMMT), based on Melodic Intonation Therapy, warrants additional research

 

POPULATION:  ASD

 

MODALITY TARGETED:  production

 

 

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:  music (rhythm, intonation, pitch), rate.

 

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: Articulation

 

DOSAGE:  45 minute individual sessions for 40 (Proof of Concept study) or 25 sessions (Replication study or Comparison study)

 

ADMINISTRATOR:  probably SLP

 

 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

 

  • Two treatments were described in the article:AMMT and SRT

 

 

AUDITORY-MOTOR MAPPING TRAINING (AMMT)

 

  • AMMT is derived from Melodic Intonation Therapy.

 

  • The main objective of AMMT is to increase speech sound accuracy and intelligibility.

 

  • AMMT involves scaffolding, massed practice, spaced practice, and several behavioral management techniques.

 

  • Clinicians (Cs) model intoned bisyllables at 1 syllable per second using 2 pitch levels that corresponded to naturalspeech. The C accompanied the production of the intoned bisyllables with tapping of an electronic drum using the same pitches as the intoned modeled bisyllables. Again, the rate is one tap per second.

 

  • There are 5 hierarchical steps in AMMT:

–  Listening:  The C produces a model of the bisyllable target word at the end of a sentence. Example: “It is fun to blow bubbles” (p. 6.)  The target was intoned using the 2 pitches and the intoning was accompanied the tapping of an electronic drum.

 

–  Unison: C and P produce the bisyllable target word together. Example:  C says: “Let’s say it together:  bubbles” (p. 6.) The target was intoned using the 2 pitches and the intoning was accompanied the tapping of an electronic drum.

 

–  Unison Fade: C says the first syllable of the bisyllable target word, cuing P to produce the whole target. Example:  C says: Again:  bu….”   (p. 6.) The target was intoned using the 2 pitches and the intoning was accompanied the tapping of an electronic drum.

 

–  Imitation: C models the target word and directs P to imitate. The target was intoned using the 2 pitches and the intoning was accompanied the tapping of an electronic drum. Example:

∞  C says: “My turn: bubbles.” (p. 6)

∞  C says: “You turn …..”  (p. 6)

 

–  Cloze: C elicits the independent production of the bisyllable target from P. Example: “Last time It’s fun to blow …..” (p. 6.).

 

  • Each session involved 15 bisyllable target words in which each was practiced 5 times before moving to the next target.

 

 

SPEECH REPETITION THERAPY  (SRT)

 

  • SRT used the same procedures at AMMT without the intoning and drumming.

 


Mahoney (2015)

February 8, 2018

SECONDARY REVIEW CRITIQUE

NOTE: A summary of the reviewed prosody-based interventions can be viewed by scrolling about two-thirds of the way down this page.

KEY:

CAS = Childhood Apraxia of Speech

C = clinician

MIT = Melodic Intonation Therapy

NA = not applicable

P = patient or participant

pmh = Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech-language pathologist

SR = Systematic Review

VML = Verbal Motor Learning (VML)

 

 

Source: Mahoney. K. (2015). A narrative review of the intervention techniques for childhood apraxia of speech. Undergraduate Review, 11, 81-90. From the institutional repository of Bridgewater State University (Bridgewater, MA.) Retrieved from h7p://vc.bridgew.edu/undergrad_rev/vol11/iss1/15

 

Reviewer(s): pmh

 

Date: February 6, 2018

 

Overall Assigned Grade: C The highest possible Overall Assigned Grade is B which is based on the design of the investigation. The Overall Assigned Grade does not reflect a judgment regarding the quality of the intervention.

 

Level of Evidence: B (Systematic Review with Broad Criteria)

 

Take Away: Although the investigator reviewed 13 sources, only 5 involved prosody in the treatment protocols. These 5 will be the focus of this Secondary Review Critique. The results of the Systematic Review (SR) revealed that 3 of the 5 prosody based interventions resulted in significant improvement.

 

What type of secondary review? Narrative Systematic Review

 

 

  1. Were the results valid?

 

– Was the review based on a clinically sound clinical question? Yes

 

– Did the reviewer clearly describe reasonable criteria for inclusion and exclusion of literature in the review (i.e., sources)?       Yes

 

– The author of the secondary research noted that she reviewed the following resources: internet based databases and ASHA online journals

 

– Did the sources involve only English language publications? Yes

 

– Did the sources include unpublished studies? No

 

– Was the time frame for the publication of the sources sufficient? Yes

 

– Did the author of the secondary research identify the level of evidence of the sources? Yes

 

– Did the authors of the secondary research describe procedures used to evaluate the validity of each of the sources? Yes

∞ The investigator included the following information in the review which was a replication of existing research (see p. 84)

  • reference for source
  • publication year
  • intervention description/categorization
  • number of participants (Ps)
  • age of Ps
  • description of service delivery strategy
  • duration of the intervention
  • Level of Evidence

 

– Was there evidence that a specific, predetermined strategy was used to evaluate the sources? Yes

 

– Did the authors of the secondary research or review teams rate the sources independently? Yes

 

– Were interrater reliability data provided? Yes

 

– Interrater reliability data: 100% interrater agreement for the judgment of Level of Evidence

 

– Were assessments of sources sufficiently reliable? Yes

 

– Was the information provided sufficient for the reader to undertake a replication? Yes

 

– Did the sources that were evaluated involve a sufficient number of participants? No

 

– Were there a sufficient number of sources? No, but this is the current status of literature.

 

  1. Description of outcome measures:

 

— The 5 sources that were concerned used prosody within the treatment protocol and their associated outcomes were

 

  • Outcome for Ballard et al. (2010): average duration for the first 2 syllable of real words

 

  • Outcome for Lagasse (2012): the outcomes were unclear

 

  • Outcomes for Martikainen & Korpilahti (2011): percentage of correct vowels and percentage of correct consonants

 

  • Outcomes McCabe et al. (2014): percentage of correct vowels, percentage of correct consonants, and percentage of correct stress patterns

 

  • Outcomes for Vashdi (2013): word length, vocal intensity, frequency

 

 

  1. Description of results:

 

  • What measures were used to represent the magnitude of the treatment/effect size?  Some of the non-prosodic treatments provided EBP measures, but none of the prosodic treatments provided EBP measures.

 

  • Summary of the findings of the secondary research:

 

– The results of the reviewed sources for treatments involving prosody

 

  • Ballard et al. (2010)

     ∞ The durations of the first 2 syllables of real words were significantly more “normalized” for all 3 Ps. (The statistical test was the Kruskal-Wallis Test.)

 

  • Lagasse (2012)

∞ The outcomes were not provided but it was noted that p was greater than 0.05 for comparisons using the Wilcoxon test.

 

  • Martikainen & Korpilahti (2011)

     ∞ For the percentage of correct vowels, there was a significant improvement for Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) training immediately following treatment.

     ∞   For the percentage of correct consonants, there was a significant improvement for Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) training 6 weeks after the termination of treatment.

     ∞ Statistical analysis involved the application of Generalized Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel Statistics for Repeated Measures.

 

  • McCabe et al. (2014)

Only raw data were provided by the authors of the source investigation, a summary of the data was not provided in the current SR.

 

  • Vashdi (2013)

Significant improvements were noted for word length (duration), intensity, and frequency. The statistical analysis involved the use of Paired t-tests.

 

  • Were the results precise? Unclear/Variable

 

  • If confidence intervals were provided in the sources, did the reviewers consider whether evaluations would have varied if the “true” value of metrics were at the upper or lower boundary of the confidence interval? NA, confidence intervals were not provided.

 

  • Were the results of individual studies clearly displayed/presented? Yes

 

  • For the most part, were the results similar from source to source? Yes, 4 of the 5 prosody related treatments claimed improvement.

 

  • Were the results in the same direction? Yes, for the most part. Four of the 5 prosody related treatments reported improvement.

 

  • Did a forest plot indicate homogeneity? NA

 

  • Was heterogeneity of results explored? No

 

  • Were the findings reasonable in view of the current literature? Yes
  • Were negative outcomes noted? No

           

                                               

  1. Were maintenance data reported? Yes, for one investigation.
  • Martikainen & Korpilahti (2011) : For the percentage of correct consonants, there was a significant improvement for Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) training 6 weeks after the termination of treatment.

 

  1. Were generalization data reported? No

 

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTIONS

 

NOTE: The treatment procedures, for the most part, were only named, and not described, in the Secondary Review

 

Ballard et al. (2010)

 

Population: CAS, Children, N = 3 (ages: 7;8 to 10;10)

 

Prosodic Targets: Duration

 

Description of Procedure/Source (Ballard et al., 2010)

  • Design: Single Subject Experimental Design: Multiple Baselines; Behaviors Across Ps (Level of Evidence IIb)
  • Administrator: Graduate Student in SLP, supervised
  • Dosage: individual sessions 50 minutes per session, 2 times a week for 8 weeks (16 sessions)
  • Procedures: enhanced intonation patterns

 

Evidence Supporting Procedure/Source (Ballard et al., 2010)

  • All Ps produced significantly more normalized durations for the first 2 syllables of real words.

 

==========

 

Lagasse (2012)

 

Population: CAS, Children, N = 2 (ages: 5, 6)

 

Prosodic Targets: Outcomes unclear

 

Nonprosodic Targets: Outcomes unclear

 

Aspects of Prosody Used in Treatment of Nonprosodic Targets: music (pitch/intonation, tempo, loudness)

 

Description of Procedure/Source Lagasse (2012)

 

  • Design: Single-Subject Design: AB (Level of Evidence: IIb)
  • Administrator: Music Therapist
  • Dosage: in the home, 40 minutes, 1 time a week, 4 weeks; Ps also received SLP services concurrently
  • Procedures: Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT)

 

Evidence Contraindicating Procedure/Source Lagasse (2012)

  • None of the comparisons achieved significance.

 

======

 

Martikainen & Korpilahti (2011)

 

 

Population: CAS, Children, N = 1 (age: 4;7)

 

 

Nonprosodic Targets: vowels, consonants

 

Aspects of Prosody Used in Treatment of Nonprosodic Targets: music (pitch/intonation, tempo, loudness)

 

Description of Procedure/Source Martikainen & Korpilahti (2011)

  • Design: Single-Subject Experimental Design: ABA (Level of Evidence: IIb)
  • Administrator: SLP
  • Dosage: individual sessions, 30 minute sessions, 18 sessions per 6 week block
  • Procedures:

– Investigators administered 6 week long blocks of MIT and the Touch Cue Method. (Only MIT is reported in this review.) There was also a 6 week long withdrawal block and a follow up block.

 

Evidence Supporting Procedure/Source Martikainen & Korpilahti (2011)

– For the percentage of correct vowels, there was a significant improvement for Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) training immediately following treatment.

– For the percentage of correct consonants, there was a significant improvement for Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT) training 6 weeks after the termination of treatment.

 

========

 

McCabe et al. (2014)

 

Population: CAS, Children, N = 4 (ages: 5;5-8;6)

 

Prosodic Targets: stress (lexical)

 

Nonprosodic Targets: consonants, vowels

 

Aspects of Prosody Used in Treatment of Nonprosodic Targets: stress (lexical)

 

Description of Procedure/Source McCabe et al. (2014)

  • Design: Single-Subject Design: AB (Level of Evidence: IIb)
  • Administrator: SLP
  • Dosage: individual sessions, 60 minutes, 4 times a weeks, 3 weeks (12 sessions)
  • Procedures: Administered ReST

Evidence Supporting Procedure/Source McCabe et al. (2014)

– Only raw data were provided by the authors of the sources, a summary of the data was not provided in the current investigation

 

Evidence Contraindicating Procedure/Source McCabe et al. (2014)

– Only raw data were provided by the authors of the sources, a summary of the data was not provided in the current investigation

====

 

Vashdi (2013)

 

Population: CAS, Children, N = 1 (age: 14)

 

Prosodic Targets: intensity, frequency, duration

 

Description of Procedure/Source Vashdi (2013)

  • Design: Case Study (Level of Evidence: III)
  • Administrator: Verbal Motor Learning (VML) Therapist
  • Dosage: individual sessions, 30 minute sessions, 1 time a week. 4 weeks
  • Procedures:

– Administered VML therapy paired with the Distal Dynamic Stabilization Technique

 

Evidence Supporting Procedure/Source Vashdi (2013)

  • Significant improvements were noted for word length (duration), intensity, and frequency.

 

=============================================================


Kim & Tomaino (2008)

January 29, 2018

EBP THERAPY ANALYSIS

Treatment Groups 

Note: Scroll about one-half of the way down the page to read the summary of the procedure(s).

 Key:

C = Clinician

EBP = evidence-based practice

f = female

m = male

MT = music therapy

NA = not applicable

P = Patient or Participant

pmh = Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech–language pathologist

 

 

SOURCE: Kim, M., & Tomaino, C. M. (2008.) Protocol evaluation for effective therapy for persons with nonfluent aphasia. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 15, 555- 569.

 

REVIEWER(S): pmh

 

DATE: January 26, 2018

 

ASSIGNED GRADE FOR OVERALL QUALITY: C- (The highest possible grade based on the type of evidence is C. The Assigned Grade for Overall Quality is not a judgment regarding the quality of the intervention, it merely evaluates the type of research design and implementation.)

 

TAKE AWAY: Investigators reviewed music therapy (MT) describing the effectiveness of 7 MT techniques for improving articulation, fluency, prosody, and breath support for patients (Ps) with nonfluent aphasia.

 

 

  1. What type of evidence was identified?
  • What was the type of evidence? Qualitative Research involving Multiple Participants

                                                                                                          

  • What was the level of support associated with the type of evidence? Level = C

 

                                                                                                           

  1. Group membership determination:

                                                                                                           

  • If there was more than one group, were participants (Ps) randomly assigned to groups? Not Applicable (NA), there was only one group.

 

 

  1. Was administration of intervention status concealed?
  • from participants? No
  • from clinicians? No
  • from analyzers? No

                                                                    

 

  1. Were the Ps adequately described? Yes

How many Ps were involved in the study?

  • total # of Ps: 7
  • # of groups: 1
  • List names of groups and the # of participants in each group:

 

– CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS

  • Diagnosis: Nonfluent Aphasia

 

– DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age: early 50s to early 70s
  • gender: 2m; 5f
  • cognitive skills:
  • 6 of the 7 Ps displayed intact cognitive skils;
  • 1 P had difficulty attending due to drowsiness associated with medications
  • motor skills: 6 of the 7 Ps were right hemiplegic
  • etiology: All Ps had experienced single or multiple strokes in the left hemisphere
  • post onset: 21 months to 21 years
  • social-emotional Status: the mood of the Ps was described as varied
  • comorbid medical issues:
  • chronic bronchitis 1
  • depression 1  
  • hypertension, high blood pressure 5  
  • diabetes 2
  • anemia 2  
  • coronary heart disease 1
  • renal artery stenosis 1  
  • congestive heart failure 1  
  • mild dementia 1

 

– Were the groups similar before intervention began? NA, there was only one group.

                                                         

– Were the communication problems adequately described? Yes

  • disorder type:
  • All Ps diagnosed with nonfluent aphasia.
  • In addition.

∞ 3 Ps were diagnosed with apraxia

∞ 1 P was diagnosed with dysarthria

∞ 2 Ps were diagnosed with dysphagia

∞ 2 Ps were diagnosed with fluent aphasia

∞ 1 P was diagnosed with receptive aphasia

 

  • functional level: severity ranged from mild/moderate to severe

 

 

  1. Was membership in groups maintained throughout the study?
  • Did the group maintain at least 80% of its original members? Yes

                                                               

  • Were data from outliers removed from the study? No

 

 

  1. Were the groups controlled acceptably? NA, there was only one group

 

 

  1. Were the outcomes measure appropriate and meaningful? Yes

 

– OUTCOMES

  • OUTCOME #1: Articulation skills (accuracy rating)

 

  • OUTCOME #2: Fluency (words per utterance)

 

  • OUTCOME #3: Prosody (rating of rhythm and intonation)

 

  • OUTCOME #4: Breath support (number of syllables produced in sustained breath)

 

ALL the outcome measures were subjective.

 

– NONE of the outcome measures that were objective.

                                         

 

  1. Were reliability measures provided?
  • Interobserver for analyzers? No. However, the 66 videotapes were reviewed, described, and analyzed by 3 investigators. The data from these reviews were synthesized.

 

  • Intraobserver for analyzers?   No

 

  • Treatment fidelity for clinicians? NA _x__, the methodology involved a description and evaluation of treatment techniques used in music therapy with Ps with nonfluent aphasia. The purpose was not to investigate the effectiveness of a single program.

 

 

  1. Summary of the description of the results:

 

PRE AND POST TREATMENT ANALYSES

 

  • OUTCOME #1: Articulation skills (accuracy rating)— across music therapy techniques the gains for individual Ps ranged from 5% to 40%

 

  • OUTCOME #2: Fluency (words per utterance) across music therapy techniques the gains for individual Ps ranged from 5% to 65%

 

  • OUTCOME #3: Prosody (rating of rhythm and intonation) across music therapy techniques the gains for individual Ps ranged from 10% to 50%

 

  • OUTCOME #4: Breath support (number of syllables produced in sustained breath) across music therapy techniques the gains for individual Ps ranged from 0 to 5 syllables

 

– What was the statistical test used to determine significance? NA, differences were described and not subjected to inferential statistical analysis.

 

– Were confidence interval (CI) provided? No

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significanceNA, evidence-based practice data were not provided.

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported? No

 

 

  1. Were generalization data reported? No

 

 

  1. Describe briefly the experimental design of the investigation.

 

  • This qualitative research involved Protocol Evaluation in which the investigators reviewed 66 videos of MT sessions from 7 Ps with nonfluent aphasia.

 

  • The investigators identified 7 MT techniques from the literature that were used with the Ps and noted their effectiveness as well as recommended guidelines for employing each of the techniques.

 

  • The 7 MT techniques were

– Singing Familiar Songs

– Breathing into Single Syllable Sounds

– Dynamically Cued Singing

– Musically Assisted Speech

– Rhythmic Speech Cuing

– Oral Motor Exercise

– Vocal Intonation

 

 

ASSIGNED OVERALL GRADE FOR QUALITY OF EXTERNAL EVIDENCE: C-

 

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

 

PURPOSE: To describe and evaluate techniques used in MT with Ps with nonfluent aphasia and to link the findings to existing research.

 

POPULATION: Nonfluent Aphasia; Adults

 

MODALITY TARGETED: Production

 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED: rhythm, intonation

 

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION: rhythm, intonation, loudness, rate, tempo, pause

 

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: articulation; breath support

 

DOSAGE: 8 to 12 individual sessions, 3 times a weeks, 4 weeks, about 30 minutes each session

 

ADMINISTRATOR: Music therapist.

 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

 

 

 

  • The Clinician (C), a Music Therapist, administered the sessions in a quiet room.

 

  • The C administered 7 MT treatment techniques in each of the sessions:

– Singing Familiar Songs

– Breathing into Single Syllable Sounds

– Dynamically Cued Singing

– Musically Assisted Speech

– Rhythmic Speech Cuing

– Oral Motor Exercise

– Vocal Intonation

 

  • The 7 MT techniques had been derived from the existing literature and were included in the treatment of the speech and singing for Ps with nonfluent aphasia.

 

  • The sessions were recorded and then analyzed by a team of researchers who developed a description of each technique’s effectiveness and guidelines for application.

 

  • The investigators comments (summary, analyses, hints) for each of the seven techniques are listed below.

 

SINGING FAMILIAR SONGS

 

  • Description:

– C leads P in the singing of familiar songs.

– C directs P to select a favorite song.

– C and P focus on the most familiar parts of the song and repeatedly sing them.

– C assists P by modifying the tempo to match P’s skills.

– The investigators contend that modifications of tempo, loudness, and intonation can facilitate interactions between P and C.

 

  • Evidence: (see also Item #9 above)

– Six of the 7 Ps displayed improved articulation and rhythm while singing.

– Five of the Ps had “shallow” (p. 561) voice quality, this improved while singing familiar songs.

– Familiar songs and familiar portions of songs appear to increase motivation and performance.

EXAMPLE: P1

  • sang 80% of words correctly in the first verse of a familiar song and
  • during the second, less familiar, verse she sang only 60% of the words correctly and her loudness decreased 50%.
  • with practice during therapy, her performance on the second verse improved but did not reach the level of the first verse.

– The rhythm of the songs appear to facilitate articulatory accuracy.

EXAMPLE: P5

  • could not produce the words from a familiar song accurately in speech or even produce the rhythm even when cued by mouthing and/or tapping
  • in the context of singing the words P produced 80% of the words accurately and used the targeted rhythm

 

  • Hints:      

– Make sure the songs are familiar; do not improvise new songs.

– It is important to focus on the familiar portions of songs.

It is better to use songs that P knew premorbidly.

– To facilitate accurate production of rhythm and articulation while singing, C should modify the tempo to match P’s skills.

– C should provide cues (e.g., tapping, drum beating, up-down hand movement, mouthing, etc.) to facilitate P’s production.

– To improve the melody of a P’s singing, C should insure that when singing in unison with P, the C should not be too loud and at times let the Ps sing independently. Rather than rely solely on unison singing, P can model and then have C imitate singing.

– In severe cases, C may consider withholding the Musically Assisted Speech technique until P is successful with the Singing Familiar Songs technique.

 

 

BREATHING INTO SINGLE SYLLABLE SOUNDS

 

 

  • Description:

– P breathed single syllable sounds. This was achieved by having P exhale and gently vocalize speech sounds using the following hierarchy:

  • producing natural vocal sounds (e.g., yawning, throat clearing, sighing, etc.)
  • sighing vowels
  • producing vowels
  • producing bilabial consonants
  • producing alveolar consonants
  • producing velar consonants

 

  • Evidence: (see also Item #9 above)

– Articulatory accuracy increased when Cs introduced pauses between syllables.

– The addition of melody to this technique had equivocal results. EXAMPLE:

  • For one P the addition of a melody to the technique resulted in P humming rather than singing the targets.
  • Other Ps seemed to perform better when C intoned targeted syllables in unison with the P and then alternated between modeling and imitation.
  • Melody added to the stimuli was associated with more improved articulation accuracy when the singing involved tones that were disconnected (staccato) from one another rather than when they were sung with smooth transitions from one syllable to the next (in legato.) EXAMPLE:

– TWINKLE TWINKLE LITTLE STAR was associated with better articulation accuracy than AMAZING GRACE.

 

  • Hints:

— The hierarchy of targets speech sound to vocalize is a guideline. Cs should adapt the hierarchy to the articulatory skills of their P and the hierarchy can be modified during the treatment to reflect Ps’ skills.

— Modeling by the C appears to be an effective strategy.

— When targeting and modeling yawning, throat clearing, sighing, C should mimic P’s natural breathing patterns.

— The sighing of vowels is most successful when it begins with C modeling production on a slow and long exhalation.

— To assist Ps in the initiation and/or the sustaining of sounds, the investigators recommend using visual cues (e.g., hand movement) or sustaining tremolos using a guitar.

— Repetition paired with “attention and motivation” (p 561) increased the accuracy of imitation.

— The investigators note that adding a melody to the vocalizations when using this technique has equivocal effects. That is, it facilitated progress in some Ps and impeded progress with other Ps.

 

 

DYNAMICALLY CUED SINGING

 

 

  • Description: In the singing of songs, C pauses to cue P to produce the targeted word/words.

 

  • Evidence: (see also Item #9 above)

– Rhythm appeared to profit more from this technique than intonation.

– This technique seemed effective in encouraging attention as indicated by

  • increased eye contact of more than 50% in all Ps
  • limited increased rate in 6 of the 7 Ps.

– Cueing can be helpful to those who are struggling with this technique. EXAMPLE:

  • A P who perseverated a nonsense syllable was able to produce the target word when the C provided facial cues (mouthing or facial expressions.)

 

  • Hints:

– Cs should monitor the frequency of use of this technique as too frequent use could be associated with distraction or loss of interest.

– It is best to use familiar songs with this technique. Improvised songs are not as successful.

– Also Cs should avoid using phrases that tap the Ps’ internal states as they appear to be a distraction.

 

 

MUSICALLY ASSISTED SPEECH

 

 

  • Description: C identifies common phrases that are used in activities of daily living and in conversation and pairs them with familiar melodies. The phrases are taught in isolation and in role-playing of daily activities.

 

  • Evidence: (see also Item #9 above)

– Gains associated with articulation and fluency were observed with this technique.

  • Ps with articulation problems improved 10% to 30% in intelligibility
  • Ps with fluency problems rate of speech improved up to 15%.

– Ps performed better when a familiar song was reviewed first and then the daily living/conversational phrase was inserted into the melody of the familiar song. EXAMPLE:

  • Ps’ articulatory accuracy and prosody were better when Cs first introduced the targeted familiar song with its original/familiar lyrics and then used the same melody inserting the targeted daily activity/conversational phrase compared to initially targeting the daily/activity/conversational phrases paired with the familiar melody.
  • When Cs’ initially targeted the daily/activity/conversational phrases paired with the familiar melody, Ps seemed confused 80% of the time.
  • Six of the 7 Ps performances improved when Cs enhanced the rhythm of the songs by rhythmically cuing beats and accents using rhythmic cues such as drum beating or finger tapping.
  • Ps with dysarthria generally responded better to staccato (word by word or even syllable by syllable) and slow beats.
  • Ps with fluency (i.e., number or words in a phrase) problems in the absence of articulation problems generally responded better to focusing on short phrases instead of single words/syllables.
  • Ps have individual differences regarding how much setting up of the context is appropriate during the role-playing portion of this technique.

 

  • Hints:

– First present the familiar song with its standard lyrics and then insert the targeted phrases into the familiar melody.

— As a preparatory cue, Cs should use rhythmic cues (e.g., guitar strumming, finger tapping) at the beginning of each target phrase.

– Consistently pair a targeted phrase with the same familiar song.

– If a P is having trouble with a targeted phrase, consider changing the familiar song that has been paired with that phrase.

– Cs should remember to adjust the tempo of the familiar melody to optimize Ps’ production. Usually the adjustment is slowing the tempo but the tempo can be too slow or staccato for some Ps or contexts.

– Although Cs should provide some imaginary context for the role-playing portion of this task, too much attention to setting up the context is distracting.

 

 

RHYTHMIC SPEECH CUING

 

 

  • Description: P motorically claps or taps a drum to the rhythm of a target phrase. The targets can be song lyrics, daily activity phrases, or conversational phrases.

 

  • Evidence: (see also Item #9 above)

– Five of the Ps spontaneously added melody to the targeted phrases.

– Targets that had been used in the Musically Assisted Speech technique were increasingly successful.

– Ps had trouble separating rhythm and melody for the speech targets. That is some Ps sang rather than spoke speech targets using the targeted rhythm.

– A P with hemiplegia, apraxia, and rhythm problems responded well to (1) rhythm targets when the task was adapted to her physical limitations and (2) the targets initially targeted 2 syllable words and gradually moved to 3 word phrases.

– Ps with rhythm problems but not apraxia or with mild apraxia responded best to whole phrase targets.

– The investigators reported that for 6 of the 7 Ps, improved rhythm in speech and singing was “correlated with assertiveness of vocal quality” (p. 565.)

 

  • Hints:

– Cues include:

  • Beats that are “slow and steady” (p. 558) and adapted to the P’s skill level.
  • For song lyrics, the rhythm of the song is a good cue
  • For speech phrases, the rhythm of natural prosodic speaking patterns is the preferred cue.

– Using song melodies tend to be more effective than speech.

– When targeting speech, Cs should monitor Ps’ addition of melody to the target.

– Inclusion of multimodality cues and temporal cues can help P in imitating the C.

 

 

ORAL MOTOR EXERCISE

 

 

  • Description: The purpose of this technique is to improve “oral motor formations” (p. 558.) This is accomplished by C directing P to observe him/her carefully and then modeling a small part of a familiar song using exaggerated mouth and tongue movements.

 

  • Evidence: (see also Item #9 above)

– The investigators noted that this technique was associated with considerable progress in articulatory accuracy and vocal quality. One P did not respond well to this technique but that P was drowsy and inattentive during sessions.

 

  • Hints:

– C should correct P’s errors and repeat the same target multiple times.

– C’s feedback should be sensitive to P’s skill level, attention skills, motivation, and progress.

– Cs should be careful to give clear instructions and feedback and to monitor P’s performance carefully.

– This technique often is not successful with Ps with eye contact and/or attention problems. Dynamically Cued Singing or Vocal Intonation are recommended in such cases.

– Cs should be sure to allow sufficient time for Ps to process what has been modeled and to perform the target. It is best to establish a clear rhythm of modeling-waiting-responding.

 

 

VOCAL INTONATION

 

 

  • Description: C model exaggerated intonation patterns for speech phrases associated with different meanings. Cs provide visual cues (e.g., hand or head motions) representing changes in intonation/pitch as needed to achieve a positive outcome.

 

  • Evidence: (see also Item #9 above)

– The investigators noted that Ps progressed in the ability to modulate their pitch, intonation, and loudness.

– Progress was reported to have generalized out of the clinic into the nursing home context for 2Ps.

– As the result of this technique, Ps appeared more spontaneous and natural.

– Tempos that were too slow or excessively exaggerated interfered with progress.

 

  • Hints:

– The use of visual cues (e.g., hand movements representing changes in intonation) facilitated progress.

– The use of role-playing helped Ps generate intonation patterns that were appropriate to the context.

– The ideal tempo appears to be slow and clear but within normal limits for tempo and intonation.

 


Medina (1990)

December 27, 2017

EBP THERAPY ANALYSIS

Note: Scroll about two-thirds of the way down the page to read the summary of the procedures.

Key:

A = Administrator

C = Clinician

EBP = evidence-based practice

Gain1 = Gain score from Pretest to Post test 1

Gain2 = Gain score from Post test 1 to Post test 2

NA = not applicable

P = Patient or Participant

pmh = Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech–language pathologist

 

SOURCE: Medina, S. L. (1990). The effects of music on second language acquisition. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (San Francisco, CA, March 1990) ERIC Educational Resources Information Center data base. ERIC Document # ED 352-834 retrieved from http://www.geocities.ws/ESLmusic/articles/print/article02.html  on March 8, 2015.

 

REVIEWER(S): pmh

 

DATE: December 26, 2017

 

ASSIGNED GRADE FOR OVERALL QUALITY:  C+ (The highest possible grade based on the design of the study, Prospective, Nonrandomized Group with Controls, is B+.) The assigned overall grade represents the quality of the evidence supporting the intervention; it is not meant as a judgment regarding the quality of the intervention.

 

TAKE AWAY: Second-graders who were speakers of Spanish and learning English as a second language were treated with one of four story-based interventions that compared music versus speech as a presentation strategy and illustrations versus no illustrations as extralinguistic support. The target of the intervention was increased receptive vocabulary. Inferential statistics revealed that there were no significant differences between music versus speech and the illustration versus no illustration contexts. This was interpreted as supporting the use of music as an intervention because it yielded results similar to speech only presentations. Analysis of descriptive statistics suggested that while low proficiency students improved performance at follow-up, high proficiency students’ performance decreased.

 

  1. What type of evidence was identified?

 

  • What was the type of evidence? Prospective, Nonrandomized Group Design with Controls

 

  • What was the level of support associated with the type of evidence?

Level = B+

 

 

  1. Group membership determination:
  • If there was more than one group, were participants (Ps) randomly assigned to groups? Unclear

– Participants (Ps) were initially sorted into 4 groups based on performance on a vocabulary test.

– The investigator then randomly assigned members of the groups to one of four treatment groups. P. 4 this is my interpretation it may be wrong but the writing is not clear to me

 

  • If there were groups and Ps were not randomly assigned to groups, were members of groups carefully matched? Unclear

– matching/sorting is on the basis of pretreatment vocabulary. Then the Ps were randomly assigned—sounds more like block assignment to me.

If the answer to 2a and 2b is ‘no’ or ‘unclear,’ describe the assignment strategy:

 

 

  1. Was administration of intervention status concealed?
  • from participants? No
  • from clinicians? No
  • from analyzers? No

 

 

  1. Were the groups adequately described? No.

 

–           How many Ps were involved in the study?

  • total # of Ps:   48
  • # of groups: 4
  • Names of groups and the number of participants in each group:

     ∞ No Music- Illustrations, N = 13

     ∞ No Music- No Illustration, N = 11

     ∞ Music- Illustrations, N = 12

     ∞ Music – No Illustrations, N = 12

 

CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS:

  • language skills: Spanish speaking, limited English proficiency
  • educational level of parents: Second Grade

 

DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS:

  • location: Suburb of Los Angeles (CA)
  • Social-Economic Status: Students in the school were primarily low income

 

–   Were the groups similar before intervention began? Unclear

 

– Were the communication problems adequately described? No

  • Participants (Ps) were Spanish speakers who were learning English as a Second Language.

 

 

  1. Was membership in groups maintained throughout the study?
  • Did each of the groups maintain at least 80% of their original members? Yes, probably. Originally, there were 52 Ps but 4 Ps dropped out. The distribution of those who discontinued was not identified but the overall maintenance level was 92%

 

  • Were data from outliers removed from the study?

 

 

  1. Were the groups controlled acceptably? Unclear
  • Was there a no intervention group? No
  • Was there a foil intervention group? No
  • Was there a comparison group? Yes
  • Was the time involved in the comparison and target groups constant? Yes

 

 

  1. Was the outcome measure appropriate and meaningful? Yes
  • OUTCOME #1: The amount of gain in receptive vocabulary
  • The outcome measure was subjective.
  • The outcome measures was NOT objective.

 

 

  1. Were reliability measures provided?
  • Interobserver for analyzers? No
  • Intraobserver for analyzers?
  • Treatment fidelity for clinicians? No

 

 

  1. What were the results of the statistical (inferential) testing and the description of the results?

Summary Of Important Results

— What level of significance was required to claim significance? p = 0.05

 

 

PRE AND POST TREATMENT ANALYSES

 

  • OUTCOME #1: The amount of gain in receptive vocabulary

∞ There were no significant differences for music versus no music and illustration versus no illustration (and their interactions) among the 4 treatment groups at the post test 1 (immediately after the intervention) and post test 2 (follow up, 1.5 weeks after intervention.)

     ∞ The investigator noted some patterns descriptively:

  • Immediately after treatment (post test 1) and the 1.5 week delay (post test 2 or follow up) the scores of Ps receive music treatment and viewing illustrations tended to be higher.

    ∞ The following patterns also were evident in the description of the results

  • Average gains at post test 1 following the 4 treatment sessions ranged from 0.73 (No Music, No Illustration Group) to 1.5 (Music and Illustration Group.)
  • Average gains at post test 2 (or follow up) ranged from 0.82 (No Music, No Illustration Group) to 1.75 (Music and Illustration Group.)

     ∞ The investigator also described the performance of a small group of Low Proficiency Ps (i.e., Ps who had scores below 8 of 20 items correct on the pretest.)

  • Low Proficiency Ps tended to gain more than higher proficiency Ps.
  • Average gains at post test 1 ranged from 0.33 (No Music, No Illustration Group) to 2.33 (Music and Illustration Group.)
  • Average gains at post test 2 (follow up) ranged from 1.00 (No Music, No Illustration Group) to 3.33 (Music and Illustration Group.)

 

  • What was the statistical test used to determine significance? ANOVA
  • Were confidence interval (CI) provided? No

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significance?  NA, no EBP data were reported.

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported? Yes. The difference in gains from post test 1 to post test 2 were not compared using inferential statistics. However, post test 2 performance regularly outpaced post test 1 performance. This suggests that Ps, not only maintained their gains but that the gains increased over the 1.5 weeks.

 

 

  1. Were generalization data reported? No

 

 

  1. Describe briefly the experimental design of the investigation.
  • Four groups of 2nd grade speakers of Spanish who were also English Language Learners received a story-related treatment to improve receptive vocabulary.

 

  • There were four different versions of the story-related treatment. The Ps listened to a cassette recorded story that included the target. The 4 versions were

∞ No Music- Illustrations, story spoken accompanied by illustrations

∞ No Music- No Illustration, story spoken accompanied but no illustrations

∞ Music- Illustrations, story sung accompanied by illustrations

∞ Music – No Illustrations, story sung accompanied by no illustrations

 

  • The spoken and sung versions of the story had identical scripts.

 

  • Prior to the initiation of treatment, the investigator met with the Ps to establish rapport and then she administered a pretest (baseline.)

 

  • Treatment lasted for 4 days and then the investigator administered Post Test 1.

 

  • One and one-half weeks following the termination of the intervention, Post Test 2 (i.e., follow-up) was administered.

 

  • Receptive vocabulary scores were compared using two 2-way (2×2, Medium x Extralinguistic Support) ANOVA for the following dependent measures:

–   Gain score from Pretest to Post test 1 (Gain1)

–   Gain score from Post test 1 to Post test 2 (Gain2)

 

  • The condition each had 2 aspects:

– Medium: Music; No Music

– Extralinguistic Support: Illustrations: NO Illustrations

 

ASSIGNED OVERALL GRADE FOR QUALITY OF EXTERNAL EVIDENCE: C+

 

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

PURPOSE: To investigate whether (1) stories set to music were associated with the same amount of improvement in receptive vocabulary as stories presented orally and (2) stories paired with illustrations were associated with the same amount of improvement in receptive vocabulary as stories presented without illustrations.

 

POPULATION: Second language learners

 

MODALITY TARGETED: Receptive vocabulary

 

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:   music (pitch, rhythm)

 

DOSAGE: small groups; 4 days; tapes (spoken or song) were played 3 times in each treatment session

 

STIMULI: songs, spoken scripts, and illustrations

 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

 

  • The administrator (A) provided one of four treatments to each of the groups of Ps:

∞ No Music- Illustrations, N = 13

∞ No Music- No Illustration, N = 11

∞ Music- Illustrations, N = 12

∞ Music – No Illustrations, N = 12

 

  • Overall, the treatment sessions were similar. The Ps were treated in groups sessions in which A played a prerecorded sung or spoken story 3 times. The story was accompanied by pictures for the “Illustration” treatment groups but not for the “No Illustration” treatment group. The stories for all groups were the same and used identical scripts.

 

  • For the Music and No Music Treatment conditions, the tapes were clear and intelligible. Both Music and No Music tapes were described as “appealing.” The song for the Music tape was a simple tune.

 

• For the Illustration and No Illustration conditions, the A displayed large pictures depicting the story. Written words were not included in the Illustration condition and, of course, the A did not use the pictures for the No Illustrat