Hutchinson (2015)

October 17, 2018

EBP THERAPY ANALYSIS

Single Case Design

NOTE:  The summary of the intervention procedure(s) can be viewed by scrolling about two-thirds of the way down on this page.

Key:

ASD =  Autism Spectrum Disorders

C =  Clinician

EBP =  evidence-based practice

F0=  Fundamental frequency (F0)

HFA =  High Functioning Autism

NA =  not applicable

P =  Patient or Participant

pmh =  Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

PVSP =  Prosody Voice Screening Profile (PVSP)

SLP =  speech–language pathologist

WNL =  within normal limits

 

SOURCE:  Hutchison, A. K. (2015).  Aprosodia therapy: The impact on affective prosody in a child with High Functioning Autism. Thesis from the Arkansas State University  December 2015.  ProQuest Dissertations Publishing, 2015.Retrieved from https://search.proquest.com/openview/2cfdd684ebaf87963fb69a1012b3e7ac/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=18750&diss=y

 

REVIEWER(S):  pmh

 

DATE:  October 9, 2018

 

ASSIGNED OVERALL GRADE: D (The highest Assigned Overall Grade is based on the design of the investigation. In this case, the design was a Single Case investigation with the highest possible grade being D+.  The Assigned Overall Grade in not a judgment about the quality of the intervention; it is an evaluation of the quality of the evidence supporting the intervention.)

 

TAKE AWAY:  This single case investigation provides support for the use of an imitative approach to improve the expressive affective prosody of a 14-year-old male who had been diagnosed with High Functioning Autism.  Outcomes associated with the participant’s (P’s) production of fundamental frequency (f0) did not change significantly. Outcomes associated with P’s production of duration and intensity changed significantly for the signaling of Anger and Sadness but not Happiness. Subjective Outcomes associated with the production of Phrasing, Rate, and Stress significantly improved.

 

 

  1. What was the focus of the research? Clinical Research

 

 

  1. What type of evidence was identified?
  • Whattype of single subject design was used?  Case Study:  Description with Pre and Post Test Results
  • What was the level of support associated with the type of evidence?

Level =  D     

 

 

  1. Was phase of treatment concealed?
  • from participants? No
  • from clinicians?No
  • from data analyzers?No

 

 

  1. Was the participant (P) adequately described? Yes

–  How many Ps were involved in the study? 1

 

 CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age:between the ages of 8 years and 15 years
  • language:verbal and nonverbal skills within normal limits (WNL)
  • cognitive skills:WNL
  • diagnosis:Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) but not Asperger syndrome:
  • physical or sensory impairment:none
  • prosody:disturbance noted

 

–  DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age:14 years
  • gender:male
  • cognitive skills:WNL
  • language skills:WNL
  • hearing acuity:WNL
  • oral-peripheral skills:WNL

 

– Were the communication problems adequately described?  Yes

  • Disorder type:ASD, High Functioning Autism (HFA)
  • Other aspects of communication that were described:

–  stereotypical behaviors

–  communication problems

–  social interaction problems

–  prosodic problems:

  • phrasing (slight)
  • rate (slight)
  • stress

–  prosodic strengths

  • pitch
  • loudness
  • voice

 

 

  1. Was membership in treatment maintained throughout the study?Yes, there was only one P.
  • Were any data removed from the study? No

 

 

  1. Did the design include appropriate controls? No, this was a case study
  • Were preintervention data collected on all behaviors?Yes
  • Did preintervention data include untrained stimuli?Yes
  • Did preintervention data include trained stimuli?Yes
  • Was the data collection continuous? No
  • Were different treatment counterbalanced or randomized? Not Applicable (NA), there was only one treatment.

 

 

  1. Were the outcome measures appropriate and meaningful? Yes

ACOUSTIC MEASURES

  • OUTCOME #1:Fundamental frequency (F0) of imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #2:F0of imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #3: F0of imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #4: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #5: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #6: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #7: Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #8: Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #9:Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #10: Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #11: Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #12:Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #13: Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #14: Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #15:Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #16:Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #17: Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #198: Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

PERCEPTUAL MEASURES

  • OUTCOME #19: Changes in the judgment of Phrasing of 25 spontaneous utterances on the Prosody Voice Screening Profile (PVSP) from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #20:Changes in the judgment of Rate of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #21:Changes in the judgment of Stress of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #22:Changes in the judgment of Quality of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention – 100% at preintervention
  • OUTCOME #23: Changes in the judgment of Pitch of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention– 100% at preintervention
  • OUTCOME #24:Changes in the judgment of Loudness of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention– 100% at preintervention

 

 

–  The subjective outcomes are

  • OUTCOME #19: Changes in the judgment of Phrasing of 25 spontaneous utterances on the Prosody Voice Screening Profile (PVSP) from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #20:Changes in the judgment of Rate of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #21:Changes in the judgment of Stress of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #22:Changes in the judgment of Quality of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention – 100% at preintervention
  • OUTCOME #23: Changes in the judgment of Pitch of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention– 100% at preintervention
  • OUTCOME #24:Changes in the judgment of Loudness of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention– 100% at preintervention

 

–  The objective outcomes are

  • OUTCOME #1:Fundamental frequency (F0) of imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #2:F0of imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #3: Fundamental frequency (F0) of imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #4: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #5: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #6: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #7: Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #8: Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #9:Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #10: Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #11: Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #12:Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #13: Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #14: Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #15:Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

  • OUTCOME #16:Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #17: Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention
  • OUTCOME #18: Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention

 

–  Reliability Data:

  • The investigator provided some intraobserver (but not interobserver) reliability data. The metric involved remeasuring 10% of the samples for fo. duration, and stress. The investigator then noted the difference in the original and the reliability measurements

∞  F0differed by 0.97 Hz (Outcomes 1 to 3)

∞  Duration of full sentences differed by 20 ms (Outcomes 4-6)

∞  Duration of unstressed syllables differed by 4.96 ms (Outcomes 7-9)

∞  Duration of stressed syllables differed by 2.67 ms  (Outcomes 10-12)

∞  Intensity of unstressed syllables differed by 0.02 volts (Outcomes 13-15)

∞  Intensity of stressed syllables differed by 0.013 volts (Outcomes 16-18)

 

 

  1. Results:

–  Did the target behavior(s) improve when treated? Yes, for the most part, although the fooutcomes did not improve significantly.

 

ACOUSTIC MEASURES

  • OUTCOME #1:Fundamental frequency (F0) of imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post interventionNo significant difference; ineffective
  • OUTCOME #2:F0of imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention- No significant difference; ineffective
  • OUTCOME #3: Fundamental frequency (F0) of imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention– No significant difference; ineffective

 

  • OUTCOME #4: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  moderate improvement
  • OUTCOME #5: Duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  moderate improvement
  • OUTCOME #6: duration of imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  moderate improvement

 

  • OUTCOME #7: Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention – No significant difference; ineffective
  • OUTCOME #8: Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention – No significant difference; ineffective
  • OUTCOME #9:Duration of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  moderate

 

  • OUTCOME #10: Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention – No significant difference; ineffective
  • OUTCOME #11:Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  moderate improvement
  • OUTCOME #12:Duration of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  moderate improvement

 

  • OUTCOME #13: Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention – No significant difference; ineffective
  • OUTCOME #14: Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention –  Significant Difference;  strong improvement
  • OUTCOME #15:Intensity of unstressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention –  Significant Difference; strong improvement

 

  • OUTCOME #16:Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Happiness changes from preintervention to post intervention – No significant difference; ineffective
  • OUTCOME #17: Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Anger changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  strong improvement
  • OUTCOME #18: Intensity of stressed syllables in imitative sentences representing the emotion Sadness changes from preintervention to post intervention – Significant Difference;  strong improvement

 

PERCEPTUAL MEASURES

  • OUTCOME #19: Changes in the judgment of Phrasing of 25 spontaneous utterances on the Prosody Voice Screening Profile (PVSP) from preintervention to post intervention—preintervention = 12% correct , post intervention = 100% correct; strong improvement
  • OUTCOME #20: Changes in the judgment of Rate of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention —preintervention = 16% correct , post intervention = 84% correct; moderate improvement  
  • OUTCOME #21:Changes in the judgment of Stress of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention —preintervention = 56% correct, 84% post intervention =  84% correct; moderate improvement  
  • OUTCOME #22:Changes in the judgment of Quality of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention – 100% at preintervention; not considered a treatment outcome
  • OUTCOME #23: Changes in the judgment of Pitch of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention– 100% at preintervention; not considered a treatment outcome
  • OUTCOME #24:Changes in the judgment of Loudness of 25 spontaneous utterances on the PVSP from preintervention to post intervention– 100% at preintervention; not considered a treatment outcome

 

 

  1. Description of baseline:
  • Were preintervention data provided?Yes. But the  preintervention data for all outcomes  were generated with only one data point.

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significance? NA

 

 

  1. Was information about treatment fidelity adequate? NA

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported?No

 

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?Yes
  • Performance on the PVSP (see item 8b- Perceptual Measures) could be considered generalization data because the PVSP was derived from spontaneous samples and spontaneous speech was not the focus of the intervention.
  • Changes in the 3 PVSP outcomes that were used in the pre- and post- intervention comparisons ranged from moderate to strong improvement. (NOTE: The three other PVSP outcomes were not included in the pre-and post- intervention comparisons because preintervention performance was 100% correct. )

 

 

  1. Brief description of the design:
  • A single P, who was diagnosed as having High Functioning Autism, was administered 10 weeks of therapy.
  • Prior to (preintervention) and after (post intervention), the investigator collected the same measurements from the P.
  • For the most part, the investigator compared the measures using the parametric statistic the paired sample t-test.

 

 

ASSIGNED OVERALL GRADE OF THE QUALITY OF SUPPORT FOR THE INTERVENTION:  D-

 

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

PURPOSE:  To improve the production of affective prosody.

 

POPULATION:   ASD (HFA); children

 

MODALITY TARGETED:  production

 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  affect, stress, intensity, fo, duration/rate, phrasing

 

DOSAGE:   1 hour sessions; 1 time a week; 10 weeks

 

ADMINISTRATOR:  Graduate Student in SLP

 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

 

  • The intervention (The Imitative Approach) contained 6 steps in which the clinician (C) initially provided maximal cues and gradually faded the cues.
  • Three consecutive correct responses were required to move from one step to the next.

 

STEP 1:

  • C identifies target affect (happy, sad, angry, or neutral) and the P’s task.
  • C directs P to listen and she models a written sentence using the target emotion.
  • C and P repeat the target sentence with the targeted emotion together (in unison.),

 

STEP 2:

  • C models the target written sentence with the appropriate prosody and facial expression.
  • C directs P to produce the modeled sentence and affect.
  • Correct response = correct sentence and prosody (appropriate facial expression is not required).

 

STEP 3:

  • C models the target written sentence with the appropriate prosody.C covers his/her face thus obstructing the P’s view of her facial expression.

 

STEP 4:

  • C presents a sentence with a neutral prosody and directs the P to imitate the sentence with a targeted prosody (i.e., happy, sad, or angry).

 

STEP 5:

  • C asks a question designed to elicit the target written sentence with a specific affect.
  • For example, to elicit a happy(or sad or angry) affect for the target written sentence “The fair starts tomorrow,“ C asks “Why are you so happy (or sad or angry?”)

 

STEP 6:

  • Using the same target written sentence, the C directs a role playing task in which the P shares a targeted affective/ emotional state with a family member.

 

 

 

Advertisements

Stoeckel (2016)

August 14, 2018

CRITIQUE OF UNSUPPORTED PROCEDURAL DESCRIPTIONS

(also known as Expert Opinion)

NOTE:  Scroll ½ way down this post to access the summaries for the 5 activities.

KEY

C =  clinician

CAS = Childhood Apraxia of Speech

NA = not applicable

P =  patient or participant

pmh =  Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech-language pathologist

Source:  Stoeckel, R. (2016.)  5 fun ways to mix prosody into CAS therapy.  Retrieved from http://www.medbridgeeducation.com/blog/2016/10/5-fun-ways-to-mix-prosody-into-cas-therapy/ 

Reviewer(s):  pmh

Date:  August 14, 2018

Overall Assigned Grade (because there are no supporting data, the highest grade will be F)

Level of Evidence:  F = Expert Opinion, no supporting evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention although the author may provide secondary evidence supporting components of the intervention. The Level of Evidence grade should not be construed as a judgment of the quality of the recommended activities. It is only concerned with the nature of the evidence supporting the author’s recommendation.

 

Take Away:  This blog post briefly describes activities that speech language pathologists (SLPs) can use to integrate prosody into interventions for children with Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS.) 

  1. Was there a review of the literature supporting components of the intervention?No, the author did not provide a review of the literature supporting the recommended activities but did provide a brief review of a rationale for integrating prosody activities into intervention for children with CAS.

 

  1. Were the specific procedures/components of the intervention tied to the reviewed literature? No, the author did not provide a review of the literature supporting the recommended activities but did provide a brief review of a rationale for integrating prosody into intervention for children with CAS.

 

  1. Was the intervention based on clinically sound clinical procedures? Yes

 

  1. Did the author(s) provide a rationale for components of the intervention? No

 

  1. Description of outcome measures:

 

  • Are outcome measures suggested? No

 

  1. Was generalization addressed? No

 

  1. Was maintenance addressed? No

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

NOTE:  The author recommended 5 activities for integrating prosody into treatment of children with CAS. The 5 activities are

–  Songs and Fingerplays

–  Toys that Provide Auditory Feedback

–  Action Figures, Dolls, and Stuffed Animals

–  Board Games

–  Books

Songs and Fingerplays

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  stress, music

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:  duration, loudness, pitch

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: production of word or phrase

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • The clinician (C) can focus on either one aspect of prosody or multiple aspects of prosody depending on the age of the child.
  • For example, C may encourage the participant (P) to use duration alone to mark stress or to use pitch, loudness, and duration.
  • This activity can also be used to focus on target words/phrases to be produced in the songs.

 

 Toys that Provide Auditory Feedback

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children 

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  loudness, music

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:  rhythm

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: production of syllables

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • Toys with embedded microphones can facilitate the production of different aspects of prosody.
  • The use of drums can encourage the production of loudness or of targeted syllables.

 

Action Figures, Dolls, and Stuffed Animals

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED: pitch, loudness

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: voice quality; words/phrases

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • Role playing with action figures, dolls, and stuffed (plush) animals can focus on prosody by encouraging P to use different speaking styles for different characters and to signal different meanings.
  • C encourages target words/phrases production as part of the play.

 

Board Games

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children 

MODALITY TARGETED: production

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  rate, contrastive stress

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: voice quality 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • Before taking a turn P imitates sentences/phrases modeled by C with

– different voice qualities or

– different rates

  • C asks P questions to elicit contrastive such as

– Is it YOUR turn or MY turn?  (p. 2)

– Does your character have BLUE eyes? (p. 2.)

Books

POPULATION:  Childhood Apraxia of Speech; Children 

MODALITY TARGETED: production 

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED:  affective prosody

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED: literacy 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

EMERGING READERS:

  • When reading with the P, C has him/her complete a sentence that signals

– an emotion,

– emphasis,

–  a character voice (p. 2.)

 

READER:

  • C identifies passages that could benefit with modifications of prosody to enhance interest.
  • C provides reading material a little below P’s reading level when P is practicing prosodic modifications during reading aloud activities.

 

=========================================================

 


Watson (2016)

July 25, 2018

SECONDARY REVIEW CRITIQUE

KEY:

C = clinician

f =  female

m =  male

MIT = Melodic Intonation Therapy

NA = not applicable

P = patient or participant

pmh = Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech-language pathologist

SR = Systematic Review

 

 

Source:  Watson, S. (2016). Melodic Intonation Therapy: The influence of pitch and rhythm on therapy outcomes.   Retrieved from https://www.uwo.ca/fhs/lwm/teaching/EBP/2015_16/Watson.pdf  July 16, 2018

 

Reviewer(s):  pmh

 

Date:  July 23, 2108

 

Overall Assigned Grade:  C+The highest Overall Assigned Grade is B which is based on the design of the investigation. The Overall Assigned Grade represents the quality of the evidence supporting the intervention. It does not reflect a judgment about the quality of the intervention.

 

Level of Evidence:  B

 

Take Away:  The purpose of this critical review was to compare the importance rhythm and pitch for successful application of Melodic Intonation Therapy (MIT.) The investigator identified only 3 sources that met inclusion criterion. Nevertheless, preliminary impressions indicate that both traditional MIT and Rhythmic Therapy resulted in improvement of trained phrases/sentences immediately following therapy. In addition, in one source indicated that traditional MIT was superior to Rhythmic Therapy for the immediate generalization to untrained targets and to long-term retention of progress for trained targets.

 

What type of secondary review?  Narrative Systematic Review

 

  1. Were the results valid?Yes

 

  • Was the review based on a clinically sound clinical question?

 

  • Did the reviewer clearly describe reasonable criteria for inclusion and exclusion of literature in the review (i.e., sources)?No

 

  • The author of the secondary research noted that she reviewed the following resources: internet based databases 

 

  • Did the sources involve only English language publications?Yes

 

  • Did the sources include unpublished studies? No

 

  • Was the time frame for the publication of the sources sufficient?Unclear

 

  • Did the author of the secondary research identify the level of evidence of the sources? No, but it could be interpreted from the prose.

 

  • Did the author of the secondary research describe procedures used to evaluate the validity of each of the sources?No, but it could be derived from the review.

 

  • Was there evidence that a specific, predetermined strategy was used to evaluate the sources?Yes

 

  • Did the author of the secondary research or a review teams rate the sources independently? No,there was only a single reviewer.

 

  • Were interrater reliability data provided?No

 

  • If there were no interrater reliability data, was an alternate means to insure reliability described? No

 

  • Were assessments of sources sufficiently reliable? Unclear, reliability data were not provided.

 

  • Was the information provided sufficient for the reader to undertake a replication?Yes

 

  • Did the sources that were evaluated involve a sufficient number of participants? No

 

  • Were there a sufficient number of sources?No,only 3 sources were identified.

 

 

  1. Description of outcome measures:

 

STAHL et al. (2013) investigation:

  • Outcome #1:  Percentage of correct syllables (articulatory quality)

 

WILSON et al. (2006) investigation:

  • Outcome #2: Recall and production of sentences

 

ZUMBANSEN

  • Outcome #3:  Percent correct syllables

 

 

 

  1. Description of results:

 

–  What measures were used to represent the magnitude of the treatment/effect size?  No measure of the magnitude of the treatment effect/effect size were reported

 

–   Summarize overall findings of the secondary research:

  • This critical review investigated the relative importance of the rhythm and pitch components of MIT.

 

  • The author employed Narrative Systemic Review methodology using broad criteria (i.e., sources reviewed by the investigator included case studies and control studies with small numbers and/or nonrandomized group assignment) and reliability data were not provided.

 

  • Only 3 sources met inclusion criteria involving a total of 19 participants (Ps.)

 

  • The sources compared different treatments:

–  Traditional MIT with pitch and rhythm components (all 3 sources)

– Rhythmic Therapy –  a derivation of MIT in which P spoke the phrases rhythmically with natural prosody but no singing/chanting (all 3 sources)

– Traditional Speech Therapy – P spoke but no pitch/singing or rhythmic components (2 of the sources)

 

  • Overall, the immediate results indicated

– Trained sentences/phrases assessed immediately after termination of therapy indicated that

  • Traditional MIT and Rhythmic Therapy yielded equivocal results but both were significantly better than Traditional Speech Therapy

– Untrained sentences/phrases assessed immediately after termination of therapy indicated that

  • One source reported Traditional MIT and Rhythmic Therapy yielded equivocal results.
  • But the other source reported that Traditional MIT yielded superior results.

 

  • However,maintanence (follow-up) assessments revealed that

– Long term retention of progress for trained sentences/phrases yielded variable outcomes:

  • In one source, Traditional MIT was superior with respect to Long term retention of progress.
  • In another source, there was not a significant difference with respect to Long term retention of progress for the MIT and Rhythmic Therapy.

 

  Were the results precise?  No

 

–  If confidence intervals were provided in the sources, did the reviewers consider whether evaluations would have varied if the “true” value of metrics were at the upper or lower boundary of the confidence interval?Not Applicable (NA) 

 

–  Were the results of individual studies clearly displayed/presented?  Yes

 

–  For the most part, were the results similar from source to source?  Yes

 

–  Were the results in the same direction?  Yes

 

–  Did a forest plot indicate homogeneity? NA 

 

–  Was heterogeneity of results explored?  NA

Yes  _x__     No ___     Unclear/Variable  ___ 

 

–  Were the findings reasonable in view of the current literature?  Yes

 

–  Were negative outcomes noted?  Yes

           

                                                                                                                   

  1. Were maintenance data reported? Yes
  • The focus of the review was whether both rhythm and pitch are required for successful application of MIT.
  • 2 of the 3 interventions explored maintenance.
  • One of the studies determined that both the typical MIT intervention(rhythm and pitch/singing) and the rhythm only conditions yielded long term positive progress.
  • One study determined that the typical MIT intervention(rhythm and pitch/singing) and yielded long term positive outcomes that were superior to the rhythm only condition.

 

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?Yes
  • The focus of the review was whether both rhythm and pitch are required for successful application of MIT.
  • 2 of the 3 investigations explored generalization to untrained stimuli.
  • One of the 2 investigations determined that generalization from trained to untrained phrases resulting from rhythm only and typical MIT conditions were not superior to traditional speech therapy.
  • The other investigation determined that generalization from trained to untrained phrases resulting from rhythm only and typical MIT conditions were superior to traditional speech therapy.
  • One of the investigations explored generalization of trained phrases to connected speech and it was found that both typical MIT and rhythm only conditions were superior to traditional speech therapy.

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

  • Three interventions were described in the Critical Review:

–  Traditional MIT

–  Rhythmic Therapy

–  Traditional Speech Therapy

 

  • Only Traditional MIT and Rhythmic Therapy are summarized below because Traditional Speech Therapy does not include prosodic components.

 

TRADITIONAL MIT

 

Population:  Aphasia (nonfluent, Broca’s); Adults

 

Nonprosodic Targets:  sentence production, articulatory accuracy

 

Aspects of Prosody Used in Treatment of Nonprosodic Targets:  music/singing (pitch and rhythm)

 

Description of Traditional MIT

  • The clinician (C) followed a protocol in which target phrases/sentences were modeled using singing/chanting/intoning and tapping. The protocol involved gradually fading of C’s support and feedback.
  • NOTE: one of the investigations used well-known songs rather than the traditional MIT singing/chanting.

 

Evidence Supporting Traditional MIT

  • All 3 sources reported improvement using Traditional MIT.
  • However, Traditional MIT did not appear to be superior to Rhythmic Therapy for trained phrases/sentence immediately following the termination of intervention.
  • Traditional MIT appeared to be superior in generalization of progress to untrained sentences/phrases and connected speech.
  • Traditional MIT may be superior in maintaining Long Term progress.

 

 

RHYTHMIC THERAPY

 

Population:  Aphasia (nonfluent, Broca’s); Adults

 

Nonprosodic Targets:  sentence production, articulatory accuracy

 

Aspects of Prosody Used in Treatment of Nonprosodic Targets:  rhythm

 

Description of Rhythmic Therapy

  • C followed the MIT protocol but did not sing/chant/intone. Rather, C modeled phrases/sentences using a rhythmic but natural prosody as well as tapping.

 

Evidence Supporting Rhythmic

  • All 3 sources reported immediate improvement in trained phrases using Rhythmic Therapy.

 

Evidence Contraindicating Rhythmic Therapy

  • Traditional MIT was superior to Rhythmic Therapy for

–  generalization of progress to untrained sentences/phrases and connected speech

     –  maintaining Long Term progress

————————————————————————————————————


Hallam (2018)

July 16, 2018

EBP THERAPY ANALYSIS

Treatment Groups

Note: Scroll about two-thirds of the way down the page to read the summary of the procedure(s).

Key:

C = Clinician

EBP = evidence-based practice

f = female

m = male

NA = not applicable

P = Patient or Participant

pmh =  Patricia  Hargrove, blog developer

RFR =  Rhythm for Reading program

SES = socioeconomic status

SLP = speech–language pathologist

 

SOURCE:  Hallam, S. (2018). Can a rhythmic intervention support reading development in poor readers?  Psychology of Music, 1-14. DOI:  10.1177/0305735618771491

REVIEWER(S):  pmh

 

DATE: July 13, 2018

 

ASSIGNED GRADE FOR OVERALL QUALITY:  B+ The highest possible grade, based on the design of the investigation, is  A. The Grade for Overall Quality reflects the quality of the evidence supporting the intervention. It is not an evaluation of the quality of the intervention nor is it an evaluation of the paper itself.

 

TAKE AWAY: Rhythm for Reading (RFR), a music-based intervention, resulted in improved reading accuracy and comprehension (but not reading rate) in poor readers in London schools who were 11-12 years of age.

 

  1. What type of evidence was identified?

                                                                                                           

  • What was the type of evidence?Prospective, Randomized Group Design with Controls

                                                                                                           

  • What was the level of support associated with the type of evidence? Level = A

 

                                                                                                           

  1. Group membership determination:

                                                                                                           

  • If there was more than one group, were participants (Ps) randomly assigned to groups? Yes, but  the investigators claimed that the Ps also were distributed equally on several variable.

 

  • If there were groups and Pswere not randomly assigned to groups, were members of groups carefully matched?  NA __x_____

                                                                    

 

  1. Was administration of intervention status concealed?

                                                                                                           

  • from participants? No

                                                                    

  • from clinicians? No

                                                                    

  • from analyzers? Unclear

                                                                    

 

  1. Were the groups adequately described? Yes

 

– How many  Ps were involved in the study?

  • total # of Ps: 421
  • # of groups:2
  • List names of groups and the # of participants in each group:
  • Treatment group = 209
  • Control group (no treatment) = 212

 

CONTROLLED CHARACTERISTICS

  • age:only included Ps who had just achieved or not achieved national reading criteria
  • Treatment group =  11 to 12 years old
  • Control group =  11 to 12 years old

 

  • gender:
  • Treatment group =  147 (m); 62 (f)
  • Control group =  141 (m); 71 (f)

 

  • Reading accuracy:
  •   Treatment group =  91.98
  • Control group =  91.34

 

  • Reading comprehension:
  • Treatment group =  85.57
  • Control group =  86.03

 

  • Reading rate:
  • Treatment group =  89.65
  • Control group =  98.58

 

  • Educational Level:
  • Treatment group =  year 7; first year of secondary school (British school system)
  • Control group =  year 7; first year of secondary school (British school system)

 

DESCRIBED CHARACTERISTICS

 

  • eligible for Free Lunch:
  • Treatment group =  70
  • Control group = 75

 

–   Were the groups similar before intervention began? Yes

                                                         

–  Were the communication problems adequately described?  Yes

  • disorder type: Literacy skills were labeled as ‘poor.’

 

 

  1. Was membership in groups maintained throughout the study?

                                                                                                             

  • Did each of the groups maintain at least 80% of their original members?Yes

                                                               

  • Were data from outliers removed from the study? No 

 

 

  1. Were the groups controlled acceptably?  Yes

                                                                                                             

  • Was there a no intervention group?Yes
  • Was there a foil intervention group? No
  • Was there a comparison group?No
  • Was the time involved in the foil/comparison and the target groups constant? NA, the control group was a No Intervention group.

 

 

  1. Were the outcomes measure appropriate and meaningful? Yes

 

–  OUTCOMES

  • OUTCOME #1:Changes in reading accuracy as measured by NARA II
  • OUTCOME #2:Changes in reading comprehension as measured by NARA II
  • OUTCOME #3:Changes in reading rate as measured by NARA II

 

–  The outcome measures that are subjective were

  • OUTCOME #1:Changes in reading accuracy as measured by NARA II
  • OUTCOME #2:Changes in reading comprehension as measured by NARA II

 

–  The outcome measure that is objective is

  • OUTCOME #3:Changes in reading rate as measured by NARA II

                                         

 

  1. Were reliability measures provided?
  • Interobserver for analyzers?No
  • Intraobserver for analyzers?No 
  • Treatment fidelity for clinicians? No

 

 

  1. What were the results of the statistical (inferential) testing and/or the description of the results?

 

SUMMARY OF IMPORTANT RESULTS

TREATMENT AND NO TREATMENT GROUP ANALYSES

 

—  What level of significance was required to claim significance?  p = 0.05

 

  • OUTCOME #1:Changes in reading accuracy as measured by NARA II—

Treatment group produced significantly more change than the control group

 

  • OUTCOME #2:Changes in reading comprehension as measured by NARA II–

–  Treatment group produced significantly more change than the control group

     – For the subgroup of Ps who received free lunches, Ps who received intervention performed significantly better than the control group

 

  • OUTCOME #3:Changes in reading rate as measured by NARA II—

–  The changes produced by the Treatment and Control groups were not significantly different.

 

–   What was the statistical test used to determine significance?

  • ANOVA xxx
  • MANOVA: xxx

 

–  Were confidence interval (CI) provided?  No

 

 

  1. What is the clinical significance

 

–   EBP measure provided: ETA

–  Results of EBP testing and the interpretation:

  • OUTCOME #1:

∞  Changes in reading accuracy for intervention group  versus control group as measured by NARA II—  Eta was 0.012  (small treatment effect)

 

  • OUTCOME #2:

–  Changes in reading comprehension for intervention group versus control group as measured by NARA II– Eta was 0.028  (small treatment effect)

–  Changes in reading comprehension for the subgroup of Ps who received free lunches fo intervention group versus control group as measured by NARA II– Eta was 0.014  (small treatment effect)

 

 

  1. Were maintenance data reported?No

 

  1. Were generalization data reported?No

 

 

  1. Describe briefly the experimental design of the investigation.
  • The Ps were low socioeconomic status (SES), inner city children who had been classified as having poor reading skills.
  • Ps were randomly assigned to treatment or no treatment groups. However, the assignments were not fully random because the investigators controlled for several P characteristics.
  • All Ps were assessed at the beginning and end of the treatment phase for the Treatment group. The investigators assessed the reading skills of the Ps using a published test of reading. Outcome measures were derived from the assessments.
  • The investigators compared the change for the Outcome measures to assess the effectiveness of the treatment.
  • The Ps in the Treatment group received the intervention in their home schools. The investigators reported that there was variability with respect to implementation.

 

 

ASSIGNED OVERALL GRADE FOR QUALITY OF EXTERNAL EVIDENCE:  B+

 

 

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

PURPOSE:Does musical rhythmic intervention improve reading skills?

 

POPULATION: Poor readers

 

MODALITY TARGETED:  production, comprehension

 

 

ELEMENTS OF PROSODY USED AS INTERVENTION:  music (rhythm, pitch, pausing)

 

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED:literacy

 

DOSAGE:  group, 10 minutes a week, for 10 weeks

 

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

 

  • The intervention was the Rhythm for Reading program (RFR.)

 

  • RFR was developed for economically disadvantaged children with educational challenges.

 

  • RFR is an intensive, group intervention designed to improve selected aspects of cognitive attention

–  stability,

– strength, and

– resilience.

 

  • The focus of RFR was to improve auditory processing and attention.

 

  • RFR used a variety of musical styles including

– classical western music,

– funk,

– rock,

– pop,

– syncopation, and

– metrical complexity.

 

  • Intervention activities included reading simple musical notation and the following in time with the beat of music by

– clapping,

– chanting, and

– stamping feet

 

  • Simple musical notation consisted of

–  2 levels of beat,

– restricted pitch levels, and

– restricted intervals between pitches.

 

_______________________________________________________________


Sousa (2017)

June 1, 2018

CRITIQUE OF UNSUPPORTED PROCEDURAL DESCRIPTIONS

(also known as Expert Opinion)

NOTE:  A summary of the intervention can be found by scrolling about one-half of the way down this page.

KEY

ASD =  autism spectrum disorder

C =  clinician

NA = not applicable

P =  patient or participant

pmh =  Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech-language pathologist 

Source:  Sousa, M. S. S. (2017).  Prosodic exercises for children with ASD via virtual therapy. Thesis in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Técnico Lisboa (Portugal).  Retrieved from Semantic Scholar (https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Prosodic-exercises-for-children-with-ASD-via-Sousa-Trancoso/800334b2054586baaa055b01f08c2932df93eb77) 

Reviewer(s):  pmh

Date:  May 31.2018 

Overall Assigned Grade for Evidence (because there are no supporting data, the highest grade will be F, ):  The grade of F should not be interpreted as an evaluation of the intervention described in this paper or the quality of the paper itself. It merely reflects the quality of the support for the intervention. Because there were no data, the grade is F.

Level of Evidence:  F = Expert Opinion, no supporting evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention although the author may provide secondary evidence supporting components of the intervention.

Take Away:  The author detailed the strategies for developing a mobile phone-based prosodic intervention for young Portuguese speaking children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD.) The author described methods for assessing the quality of the auditory stimuli used in the treatment and for evaluating acoustically imitations produced during the intervention by the children with ASD. The author consulted the existing literature as well as “therapists”  to identify important learning strategies and targets. Although this mobile-phone prosodic intervention was not administered, it does have potential as a model for future development.

  1. Was there a review of the literature supporting components of the intervention?Yes
  • Narrative Review

 

  1. Were the specific procedures/components of the intervention tied to the reviewed literature? Yes

  

  1. Was the intervention based on clinically sound clinical procedures? Yes

 

  1. Did the author(s) provide a rationale for components of the intervention? Yes

 

  1. Description of outcome measures:

–  Are outcome measures suggested?  Yes

  • Outcome #1: Discrimination of same and different using visual stimuli

 

  • Outcome #2: Discrimination of nonspeech auditory stimuli (affirmation versus question; pleasure versus displeasure) that differ only in intonation

 

  • Outcome #3: Discrimination of single words as representing pleasure or displeasure affective states

 

  • Outcome #4: Discriminate low versus high pitches in single words

 

  • Outcome #5: Identification of the direction of the pitches of 2 syllable productions

 

  • Outcome #6: Imitate intonation of single words

  

  1. Was generalization addressed? No

 

  1. Was maintenance addressed? No

  

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

 

PURPOSE: to develop an Android application for teaching the comprehension and production of intonation

POPULATION:  Autism Spectrum Disorder; children

MODALITY TARGETED: comprehension, production (imitation)

 ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED: pitch, intonation

OTHER TARGETS:  concepts of same/different

DOSAGE: not applicable because the program was not administered

ADMINISTRATOR:  mobile phones? (this is virtual therapy)

MAJOR COMPONENTS:

  • This intervention was developed to fulfill the thesis requirement for the Master of Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering at Ténico Lisboa (Portugal.)

 

  • Several tasks were developed for nonreading children to use on Android phones including

–  2 activities to teach the concept of same/different

– one activity to teach the discrimination of single words as being same or different when they could differ only by intonation patterns representing question/affirmation  or pleasure/displeasure.

–  one activity to teach the imitation of single words that differed only by intonation patterns representing question/affirmation  or pleasure/displeasure.

– one activity to teach the identification of pleasure/displeasure affective states of single words.

– one activity to teach the identification of high versus low pitches on auditory stimuli (initially nonspeech sounds, moving to speech sounds)

– one activity to teach the identification of sequences of pitches produced on sounds (e.g., high-high, low-low, high-low, etc.)

 

=========================================================

 


Block (2017)

May 21, 2018

 CRITIQUE OF UNSUPPORTED PROCEDURAL DESCRIPTIONS

(also known as Expert Opinion)

NOTE:  A brief summary of recommended interventions recommended by the author can be found by scrolling about ½  of the way down this page.

KEY
C =  clinician

fo=  fundamental frequency

NA = not applicable

P =  patient or participant

pmh =  Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech-language pathologist

Source:  Block, C. (2017.)   Making a case for transmasculine voice and communication training. Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups: Sig 3 (Part 1), 33-41.

Reviewer(s):  pmh

Date:  May 16, 201

Overall Assigned Grade: because there are no supporting data, the highest grade will be F.  This grade reflects the level of data provided in this article. It does not reflect a judgment on the value of the recommendations provided by the author.

Level of Evidence:  F = Expert Opinion, no supporting evidence for the effectiveness of the intervention although the author may provide secondary evidence supporting components of the intervention.

Take Away:  This article provides recommendations for treating voice and communication problems associated with transmasculine voices. The author highlights aspects of communication that may be a challenge to speakers and provides recommendations for treatment. In addition, the author a clear rationale for speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to provide services to speakers with transmasculine voices.

 

  1. Was there a review of the literature supporting components of the intervention?No, for many of the recommendation some existing references were briefly summarized but not critiqued.

  

  1. Were the specific procedures/components of the intervention tied to the reviewed literature? Yes

  

  1. Was the intervention based on clinically sound clinical procedures? Yes

 

  1. Did the author provide a rationale for components of the intervention? Yes

 

  1. Description of outcome measures: 

–  Are outcome measures suggested? No, but they can be derived from the article.

–  Potential outcome measures,

  • Outcome #1: Lower average fundamental frequency (fo) of speech
  • Outcome #2: Gender appropriate intonation range
  • Outcome #3: Appropriate loudness level
  • Outcome #4: Gender appropriate resonance
  • Outcome #5: Reduction in hyperfunctional vocal patterns
  • Outcome #6: Remediate problems following phonosurgery
  • Outcome #7: Language that contains more masculine gender markers

 

  1. Was generalization addressed? No

  

  1. Was maintenance addressed? No

  

SUMMARY OF INTERVENTION

PURPOSE:  The author recommended that the role of the speech-language pathologist (SLP) should be to translate research about gender and communication to an individualized treatment plan appropriate to the specific client. The focus was on the transmasculine voice

POPULATION:  Transmasculine speakers; Adults

MODALITY TARGETED:Production

ELEMENTS/FUNCTIONS OF PROSODY TARGETED: pitch, intonation, loudness, singing

OTHER ASPECTS OF LANGUAGE/COMMUNICATION TARGETED:resonance, language, nonverbal communication (body language)

ADMINISTRATOR:  SLP

MAJOR COMPONENTS

  • Prior to working on transmasculine related targets, the SLP should insure that the client is free from dysphonia or that issues related to dysphonia have been addressed adequately. Irrespective of the cause of the dysphonia, the SLP should employ appropriate rehabilitative techniques.

 

  • The author provided recommendations for treating selected aspects of communication. For each aspect of communication that the author addressed, the information is summarized by listing

–  the aspect of communication,

–  anticipated problems, and

–  recommendation(s) for treatment.

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION:  Pitch—lower frequencies

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS:  Some individuals do not achieve targeted lower pitch levels following testosterone therapy. This may be due to limited success with the hormone, failure to use the new pitch range that is available to the speaker, or electing not to receive testosterone treatment.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TREATMENT:  Behavioral pitch training including

–  a guide when to intervene

–  useful techniques such as a chant-to-speak exercise and audio and visual feedback

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION:  Intonation—limited range

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS: Speakers may compensate for the tendency to use higher pitches when speaking “expressively” (p. 34) by limiting intonation range. This can result in sounding unfriendly.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TREATMENT:  Behavioral intonation training including

–  limiting the use of higher pitches

–  increased use of falling intonation contours

–  modifying the production of stress using

  • producing longer vowels
  • producing louder vowels
  • increasing the slope of falling intonation patterns
  • reducing blending between words (i.e., more staccato)

 

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION: Loudness

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS: It can be difficult to modulate loudness separately from pitch particularly because if the speaker elects to receive testosterone treatment as it usually increases vocal fold mass.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TREATMENT: Behavioral loudness and breath control training including focusing on diaphragmatic breathing

 

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION:  Resonance

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS: Some speakers sound younger or more feminine than desired despite a fothat is within normal limits for a male. It is suggested that this is due to a small upper airway.

RECOMMENDATION(S) FOR TREATMENT:  Recommendations included focusing on

–  lowering the jaw

–  lowering the base of the tongue

 

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION:  Dysphonia

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS: If the speaker attempts to change his voice without SLP guidance, he is at risk for adapting hyperfunctional vocal patterns.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TREATMENT:  Vocal rehabilitation training

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION:  Maladaptive response to phonosurgery

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS: Speakers may experience problems following phonsurgery

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TREATMENT: Vocal rehabilitation training

 

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION:  Language production

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS: Speakers may maintain their use of feminine language patterns

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TREATMENT:  The SLP may target language behaviors such as

–  vocabulary selection

–  using fewer words to convey a meaning

 

 

ASPECT OF COMMUNICATION:  Nonverbal communication

ANTICIPATED PROBLEMS: Speakers may maintain their use of feminine body language  patterns

RECOMMENDATION(S) FOR TREATMENT:  The SLP may target nonverbal communication behaviors such as

–  taking up more space

–  increasing the rigidity of hand and body movement

 

 


Adler (2015)

May 8, 2018

                                                                                                            

CRITIQUE OF UNSUPPORTED PROCEDURAL DESCRIPTIONS

(also known as Expert Opinion)

 

KEY

C =  clinician

NA = not applicable

P =  patient or participant

pmh =  Patricia Hargrove, blog developer

SLP = speech-language pathologist

WPATH =  World Professional Association for Transgender Health

 

SOURCE:  Adler, R. (2015.)  Voice and communication for the transgender/transsexual client: Presenting the WPATH Standing Committee on Voice and Communication.  Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, 25. 32-36.

 

REVIEWER(S): pmh

 

DATE:  May 8, 2018

 

 

Overall Assigned Grade (because there are no supporting data, the highest grade will be F):  F  This grade should be interpreted as a evaluation of the Level of Evidence provided in the paper and not as a judgment about the quality of the paper or the information contained in the paper.

 

Level of Evidence:  F = Expert Opinion, no supporting evidence for the effectiveness of the recommendations although the author may provide secondary evidence supporting the interventions.

 

Take Away:  This introduction to the World Professional Association for Transgender Health (WPATH)  provides a brief rationale and history of WPATH as well as an explanation of how and why voice and communication issues were included in WPATH guidelines. In addition, the author provides a brief tutorial regarding transgender/transsexual terminology and professional resources. By accessing the WPATH webpage (referenced by the author), one can review the current “Standards of Care for the Health of Transgender, Transsexual, and Gender Nonconforming People” which includes recommendations for Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs). This is good starting point for planning to initiate practice including people who are transgender/transsexual.

 

 

 

  1. Was there a review of the literature supporting components of the intervention?No

 

 

  1. Were the specific procedures/components of the intervention tied to the reviewed literature? Not Applicable (NA)

 

 

  1. Were the recommendations based on clinically sound clinical procedures? NA

 

 

  1. Did the author provide a rationale for the recommendations? Yes

 

 

  1. Description of recommendations:

 

  • Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) working with transgender/transsexual clients should educate themselves regarding the needs of this population. A starting point can be the information in this article and the most current “Standards of Care for the Health of Transgender, Transsexual, and Gender Nonconforming People” on the WPATH website.

 

  • SLPs’ role should include communication skills such as articulation, language, prosody as well a voice.

 

  • SLPs should remember that evidence-based practice involves

– research evidence,

– clinician’s expertise, and

– client’s needs.

 

  1. Are outcome measures suggested? NA

 

 

  1. Was generalization addressed? NA

 

 

  1. Was maintenance addressed? NA